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// August 21, 2014
Connections >> An MSFHR Update - August 2014

Connections is MSFHR's monthly e-newsletter. Each issue highlights the top MSFHR news from the past month and showcases the impact of research we've funded.

Join our mailing list to receive Connections by e-mail!


In this issue:

Feature

MSFHR News

MSFHR People

Spark


Aubrey J. Tingle receives Order of BC; nominations for AJT Prize still open

MSFHR's founding President & CEO Dr. Aubrey J. Tingle was among 23 exceptional individuals appointed to the Order of British Columbia at a special ceremony held July 22 in Victoria.

Dr. Tingle was recognized for his outstanding contributions to advancing health research in British Columbia. Through his critical role in the creation of MSFHR, Dr. Tingle helped create a strong health research environment that attracts and retains the best researchers and supports them to produce innovative discoveries. He served as MSFHR's president & CEO from 2001 until his retirement in 2008.

In 2010, MSFHR created the Aubrey J. Tingle Prize to honour Dr. Tingle's work. The award celebrates the achievements of BC-based researchers who have made a significant impact on improving health and the health system.

Nominations for the 2014 Aubrey J. Tingle Prize are open until September 5.

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Applications sought for analysis of aIPCC data

MSFHR is requesting applications for a research project that will analyze data from the BC Ministry of Health to understand the impact of Accelerated Integrated Primary and Community Care (aIPCC) initiatives.

The three main categories of activity under aIPCC are home-based, system/service delivery redesign, and clinical redesign initiatives. A number of these initiatives are being implemented across the province to accelerate the Integrated Primary and Community Care (IPCC) program. This research project's primary objective is to analyze BC Ministry of Health data to identify patterns of health services use and the extent to which these patterns changed as a result of aIPCC initiatives.

The maximum amount of the award is $100,000. Experienced researchers or research teams affiliated with a BC host institution that is eligible to hold MSFHR funds are eligible to submit a proposal for this research project. Applications are due by 4 p.m. (Pacific time), September 12, 2014.

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MSFHR sponsors upcoming conferences

MSFHR is proud to support two events in September that will advance dialogue on health and health research.

  • Connect 2014
    September 22
    Coast Plaza Hotel & Suites, Vancouver

    InspireNet's fifth annual fall conference is focused on the challenges and opportunities in using research to improve health care. All researchers, clinicians, policy-makers, students/trainees, and individuals with an interest in health services research are encouraged to attend. Speakers include MSFHR's Diane Finegood (president & CEO), Bev Holmes (vice-president, research & impact), and Lori Last (director, communications). 
     
  • Interface 2014
    September 29-30
    Vancouver Convention Centre West

    Interface is the only digital health international summit in Canada that brings together health, technology, design, social media, and business. Speakers will include leading experts, innovators, and creative thinkers on the future of health, including MSFHR President & CEO Diane Finegood. Connections readers can save $100 by registering before August 29 or by using the code MSFHR14 between August 30 and September 26.

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Career opportunities

MSFHR is currently recruiting for the following position:

  • Financial Analyst
    You are a numbers whiz who loves everything to do with analysis, budgeting, forecasting, modeling and reporting.
    Deadline: August 29, 2014

  • Manager, Human Resources & Facilities
    You are an HR generalist who is proactive, creative and passionate about HR. Working closely with senior leadership, you will provide HR support to a team of 35.
    Deadline: September 5, 2014

  • Senior Coordinator, Partnerships & Marketing
    You have a strong background in fundraising, community relations, and marketing and love working with other organizations to explore and promote partnership opportunities.
    Deadline: September 9, 2014

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MSFHR People

  • Nadine Caron
    MSFHR board member Dr. Nadine Caron is featured in a new video by the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation explaining breast self-examination. Caron and a team of specialized researchers are currently collecting information from previous breast cancer patients who reside in northern BC, as a result of the current scarcity of data representing this population. Her research will help make recommendations for improved cancer care system improvements and policy development in the area of breast cancer care.
  • Menno Oudhoff
    2013 MSFHR Trainee Menno Oudhoff is one of 70 newly announced recipients of Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships. First awarded by the Government of Canada in 2010, Banting fellowships support the career development of post-doctoral researchers at Canadian universities and leading international research institutions. Oudhoff, who is based at the University of British Columbia, is researching the role of the gene Set7 in intestinal stem cells during regeneration and cancer.

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KT needs assessment survey informs SPOR business case

As a leader in the health research community, MSFHR has an important role to play in helping to close the gap between knowledge (what we know) and action (what we do), through knowledge translation (KT).

A new blog post reflects on MSFHR's 2012 provincial KT needs assessment survey and how its findings are helping to address the needs of BC's health research community with the ultimate goal of increasing the use of health research evidence in BC and beyond.

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// August 15, 2014

MSFHR is requesting applications for a research project that will analyze data from the BC Ministry of Health to understand the impact of Accelerated Integrated Primary and Community Care (aIPCC) initiatives.

The three main categories of activity under aIPCC are home-based, system/service delivery redesign, and clinical redesign initiatives. A number of these initiatives are being implemented across the province to accelerate the Integrated Primary and Community Care (IPCC) program. Initiatives range from expanding mental health treatment in the community to better assessments of seniors at risk from multiple chronic diseases to building care teams that support patients through an early discharge from acute care.

This research project’s primary objective is to use BC Ministry of Health data to identify patterns of health services utilization and the extent to which these patterns changed as a result of aIPCC initiatives. The suggested approach is to consider utilization of individual program participants before and after enrollment in the program, as compared to similar persons who are not enrolled. The project will be implemented in two phases – development of the analysis methodology, followed by conduct of the analysis itself upon receipt of data from the Ministry of Health.

> Full application instructions and guidelines

The maximum amount of the award is $100,000. Experienced researchers or research teams affiliated with a BC host institution that is eligible to hold MSFHR funds are eligible to submit a proposal for this research project.

Applications must be submitted by email to Greg Martyn, Director, Projects, (gmartyn@msfhr.org) by 4 p.m. Pacific time, September 12, 2014.


// August 6, 2014

As a leader in the health research community, the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR) has an important role to play in helping to close the gap between knowledge (what we know) and action (what we do), through knowledge translation (KT).

Knowledge translation encompasses the theories, strategies and activities used to increase the development and use of health research evidence in policy, practice and further research. MSFHR supports the KT activities of the British Columbia (BC) health research community through a variety of roles as described in our 2012 Implementation Science article.

Much of our focus has been on the role of building capacity for KT among BC researchers and knowledge users through KT skills training and access to KT resources. To further understand the KT training and resource needs in BC, MSFHR launched a provincial online needs assessment survey in March 2012. More than 1,200 people responded to the survey, which was targeted at both BC health researchers and those who use health research evidence in their work.

The results of the survey were recently outlined in a June 2014 Implementation Science article written by MSFHR’s KT and Evaluation staff. The findings emphasize the importance of considering all aspects of KT in training opportunities (e.g., tailoring research results to identified key audiences; engaging key users of the research in its development and use; understanding the body of research literature on a particular research topic; and using the research evidence in different contexts), while taking into account different stakeholder needs (e.g., different training methods, costs, levels).

The value of the survey results has already been demonstrated in relation to one provincial capacity-building effort where learnings informed the development of the business case for a Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) Support Unit in BC -- a provincial initiative co-led by MSFHR in partnership with the BC Ministry of Health. SPOR aims to improve health outcomes and enhance patients’ health care experience through the integration of research evidence at all levels in the health system; KT and KT skills training is a fundamental component of this initiative. [1] It is a national initiative developed by CIHR “to foster evidence-informed health care by bringing innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to the point of care.” [2] Read more about SPOR here.

Through our involvement in the BC SPOR Support Unit and other regional and provincial KT initiatives, opportunities will continue to be developed to address the KT needs of the health research community with the ultimate goal of increasing the use of health research evidence in BC and beyond.   

To learn more about KT, visit the KT 101 page on the MSFHR website.

 

Chelsea Noel is a Marketing & Stakeholder Relations Assistant and Jessica Collins is a Knowledge Translation Coordinator for the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research.


[1] “About SPOR”, Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research website, http://www.msfhr.org/our-work/activities/patient-oriented-research/about...

[2] "Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research", Canadian Institutes of Health Research website, http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/41204.html


// July 29, 2014

Connections is MSFHR's monthly e-newsletter. Each issue highlights the top MSFHR news from the past month and showcases the impact of research we've funded.

Join our mailing list to receive Connections by e-mail!


In this issue:

Feature

MSFHR News

Spark


MSFHR announces 2014 scholar award recipients

Thirty-two exceptional BC health researchers have been named recipients of scholar awards through MSFHR's 2014 Scholar Program funding competition.

The award recipients, selected from a highly competitive pool of more than 120 applicants, represent a bright future for health research in BC. Their innovative projects span a broad range of disciplines and will help to address important health challenges for the benefit of all British Columbians.

With a maximum term of five years, MSFHR Scholar Awards help British Columbia create and sustain a base of excellence that fosters world-class research across the health spectrum.

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Scholar award partners support research innovation

Three of this year's MSFHR Scholar Awards are jointly funded in partnership with BC-based not-for-profit organizations. The BC Schizophrenia Society Foundation and the Rick Hansen Institute have partnered with MSFHR to support high-quality research that is directly relevant to these organizations' mandates.

The recipients of partnered scholar awards in the 2014 competition are:

  • Leigh Anne Swayne (MSFHR/BC Schizophrenia Society Foundation Partner Scholar Award)
  • John Kramer (RHI/ICORD/MSFHR Partner Scholar Award)
  • Christopher West (MSFHR/RHI Partner Scholar Award)

The 2014 competition represents the second time MSFHR has partnered on scholar awards. A complete list of our scholar and trainee partners is available on our website.

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New infographic shows impact of MSFHR Scholar Awards

A recent MSFHR analysis has confirmed the significant value of scholar awards to individual research careers and to the strength of BC's health research enterprise.

With the generous support of a large cohort of past and current scholars, MSFHR analyzed CV data from 79 percent of individuals funded since 2001.

Highlights of this analysis are available in a new brochure that demonstrates the exceptional nature of the individuals and work supported by MSFHR funding.

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Understanding the peer-review process

Peer-review is a cornerstone of MSFHR's Scholar Awards and other funding programs. This mechanism ensures the research we support meets the highest scientific and academic standards. It also maintains our accountability to the provincial government and to British Columbia's health research community.

But what actually happens between the application deadline and the announcement of funding decisions? To demonstrate the excellent work of MSFHR's dedicated Programs staff, we have prepared a brief overview of the peer-review process.

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SPOR business plan submitted to CIHR

A business plan outlining the vision and model for BC's SPOR Support Unit has been submitted to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) for review.

The plan, which was formally approved by the project's Interim Governing Council in June, represents the foundation of a unit that will transform BC's health system through research by engaging patients as key members of a new partnership that includes decision-makers, health care providers, and researchers.

CIHR will conduct an iterative review of the business plan, consisting of internal and external evaluation. More information will be posted to the BC Support Unit website as it becomes available.

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2014 HSPRSN Partnership Awards launched

MSFHR is pleased to announce the launch of the 2014 Health Services & Policy Research Support Network (HSPRSN) Partnership Program.

These awards, offered annually since 2005, support BC researchers in applying to peer-reviewed national or international competitions that require matching funds as a condition of award. Successful applicants will receive up to $80,000 per project to investigate issues that address provincial health system priorities.

Currently, MSFHR has a partnership agreement with CIHR's Partnerships for Health System Improvement (PHSI) Program; however, other competitions requiring matching funds that are launched in 2014 will be considered as well.

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Nominations open for 2014 Aubrey J. Tingle Prize

Nominations are now open for the fifth annual Aubrey J. Tingle Prize and Lecture.

This prize, created in honour of MSFHR’s founding president & CEO, recognizes a BC health researcher whose work has had significant impact on advancing clinical or health services and policy research. The prize is valued at $10,000, and the winner will be invited to present at an MSFHR event scheduled in early 2015.

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Career opportunities

MSFHR is currently recruiting for the following position:

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Stronger public voice will improve impact and quality in health research

According to CIHR, fewer than 60 percent of decisions on general medical services are supported by appropriate research evidence, and up to 25 percent of patients get care that is not needed or could be harmful. Can the public — as patients, taxpayers or citizens — help change these statistics?

A new blog post by Bev Holmes, MSFHR vice-president, research & impact, examines the important role the public can play in health research and describes how the SPOR initiative is working to make this a reality.

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// July 17, 2014

A recent MSFHR analysis has confirmed the significant value of scholar awards and other funding programs to individual research careers and to the strength of BC’s health research enterprise.

With the generous support of a large cohort of past and current scholars, MSFHR analyzed CV data from 79 percent of individuals funded since 2001.

Highlights of this analysis are available in a new infographic that demonstrates the exceptional nature of the individuals and work supported by MSFHR funding.

Among the key findings:

  • 94% of MSFHR-funded scholars remain in BC as health research leaders
  • More than $1.1 billion in additional health research funding has been attracted to BC by scholar award recipients - more than 10 times MSFHR's investment of $117M
  • MSFHR-funded scholars exceed BC and Canadian quality benchmarks for impact factor and number of citations
  • 55% of MSFHR-funded scholars have achieved the level of full professor within five years of completing their scholar award

Supplementing this analysis of scholar awards, a companion document provides a visual overview of the full scope of MSFHR funding programs, including trainee awards, infrastructure projects, and government priorities.

Downloads

> MSFHR Scholar Impact (PDF)
> MSFHR Research Impact, 2001-2013 (PDF)


// July 16, 2014

Peer review is a cornerstone of MSFHR’s Scholar awards and other funding programs.

This mechanism ensures the research we support meets the highest scientific and academic standards. It also maintains our accountability to the provincial government and to British Columbia’s health research community.

But what actually happens between the application deadline and the announcement of funding decisions? To demonstrate the excellent work of MSFHR’s dedicated Programs staff, we have prepared a brief overview of the peer-review process.


How are reviewers selected?

The recruitment of review panel members and external readers is a huge undertaking.

Immediately after the competition’s letter-of-intent deadline, MSFHR programs staff create a pivot table of keywords submitted with applications and analyze which terms appear most often. Those keywords that are consistently repeated must be represented by subject matter experts on the appropriate review panel.

Two types of reviewers must be recruited:

Review panel members

These reviewers are selected for their research excellence, breadth of knowledge, and maturity of judgment. They provide a critical assessment of the application, participate in rating applications, and vote during the peer-review panel meeting. Each application is reviewed in depth by two lead reviewers.

Key facts:

  • Review panels correspond to CIHR's four research pillars (biomedical, clinical, health services, population health)
  • Recruitment of committee members can take up to 2-3 weeks
  • Review panels consist of 50% BC researchers and 50% from outside BC but within Canada

External readers

These reviewers are subject matter experts whose research corresponds exactly to the content of a particular award application. Each external reader is assigned only one application to review. They provide constructive feedback on the research approach, as well as the project's originality and potential impact. Panel members refer to the external reader reports when evaluating applications.

Key facts:

  • Recruitment of external readers for a competition can take up to 4-5 weeks
  • It can be necessary to contact 20-25 researchers to secure one external reviewer

What happens at the review panel meeting?

  • Panel members in conflict with an application leave the room for the duration of the review panel’s discussion of that application.
  • The two lead reviewers for each application summarize its strengths and weaknesses with their initial scores displayed to the rest of the review panel.
  • The committee chair leads the panel discussion, inviting feedback from all members.
  • Based on the panel’s discussion, the lead reviewers are given the opportunity to revise their initial scores.
  • The panel's scientific officer reads out notes summarizing the discussion that took place and the recommendations of panel members.
  • The lead reviewers agree on a consensus score. To ensure consistency, a common scale is used, ranging from 0 to 4.9. Panel members are encouraged to use the full range of scores.
  • All panel members, including the lead reviewers, confidentially score each application within +/- 0.5 points of the consensus score.
  • MSFHR’s Programs team produces a list of the applications in ranked order. A ranked list, with the identity of each applicant masked, is presented to the review panel for a final review.
  • Funding decisions are based on this ranked list, with the funding cut-off varying from one competition to another.

What are the principles governing peer review?

  • Confidentiality
    All information contained in applications submitted to MSFHR, reports made by reviewers, and review panel discussion is strictly confidential and subject to the BC Personal Information Protection Act.
  • Impartiality
    All reviewers must read and agree to abide by MSFHR’s guidelines on conflict of interest prior to viewing any application information.
  • Parity
    Reviewers are expected to be fair and reasonable, to exercise meticulous scientific judgment, and to understand and take into account the particular context of each application.

// July 14, 2014

The Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research is pleased to open nominations for the fifth annual Aubrey J. Tingle Prize and Lecture.

This prize is given to a British Columbia clinician scientist or scholar practitioner whose work in health research is internationally recognized and has significant impact on advancing clinical or health services and policy research — as well as its uptake — to improve health and the health system in BC and globally. The prize winner will present at an MSFHR event to be scheduled early in 2015. The prize is valued at $10,000. The deadline for nominations is Friday, September 5, 2014.

> Nomination instructions and eligibility criteria

Review and selection of the candidates will be made by a volunteer panel comprised of researchers with expertise in practice-relevant health and health system research. The panel’s recommendation will be  forwarded to MSFHR’s Board of Directors for ratification.

The Aubrey J. Tingle Prize was created to honour the important role that Dr. Tingle played as founding president & CEO of the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research from 2001 to his retirement in June 2008. A pediatrician and immunologist, Dr. Tingle has maintained a lifelong interest in the role of viruses in disease, with particular interest in rubella arthritis and juvenile diabetes.

Past winners include Dr. Julio Montaner (2010), Dr. Michael Hayden (2011), Dr. Bruce McManus (2012), and Dr. Martin Gleave (2013).

For more information or to nominate a candidate, please refer to the competition page.


// July 9, 2014

Thirty-two exceptional BC health researchers have been named recipients of Scholar awards through MSFHR’s 2014 Scholar Program funding competition.

The award recipients, selected from a highly competitive pool of more than 120 applicants, represent a bright future for health research in BC. Their innovative projects span a broad range of disciplines and will help to address important health challenges for the benefit of all British Columbians.

> View the full list of 2014 Scholar award recipients

Three of this year’s Scholar awards will be jointly funded in partnership with BC-based not-for-profit organizations. MSFHR is pleased to partner with the BC Schizophrenia Society Foundation and the Rick Hansen Institute to support research directly relevant to these organizations’ mandates.

With a maximum term of five years, MSFHR Scholar Awards help British Columbia create and sustain a base of excellence that fosters world-class research across the health spectrum. MSFHR Scholar Awards enable recipients to: focus on research activities; train the next generation of investigators; attract additional funding from national and international sources; and generate high-quality knowledge economy jobs.

Since 2001, MSFHR has invested more than $117 million in funding more than 360 Scholar awards that directly support BC’s top health researchers.


// July 7, 2014

According to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), fewer than 60 percent of decisions on general medical services are supported by appropriate research evidence, and up to 25 percent of patients get care that is not needed or could be harmful. Can the public – as patients, taxpayers or citizens – help change these statistics?

Currently, funding decisions regarding the most pressing health concerns and determining best practices for treatment are made by a combination of researchers, review panels, health and non-profit agencies, industry and governments. However, there is compelling evidence to suggest that all British Columbians have an important role to play in improving the impact of health research.

Apart from improving research impact and quality, it is also argued that as citizens, we have a right to be involved in publicly funded research that could improve or affect our health or the services we receive. To address this, “patient-oriented research” units are being established across Canada as part of CIHR’s national Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR). According to CIHR, SPOR aims “to foster evidence-informed health care by bringing innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to the point of care.”

As British Columbia’s health research agency, the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research is facilitating the development of a provincial unit within SPOR that will identify the needs of patients and the health care system and fund research that addresses those needs.

The SPOR Support Unit’s approach to establishing patient involvement in health research in British Columbia includes:

  • Training in public involvement – not only for the public, but for researchers and research-related agencies.
  • Helping these agencies to change practice and policy so that involving the public in health research, where appropriate, becomes the standard.
  • Developing evidence on public involvement itself, to learn what works best and how to improve.

SPOR is intended to improve health outcomes and enhance patients’ health care experience by integrating research evidence at all levels in the health system. This presents an important opportunity to make health research more responsive to health care system priorities focused on improved patient outcomes.

Statistics show Canadians believe in health research. Involving the public in health research in BC – improving its quality and ensuring the results are effectively used to support good health and a strong health system – will bring us closer to fulfilling that promise.

 

Bev Holmes is vice-president, research & impact for the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research and has been actively involved in developing British Columbia's SPOR Support Unit.


// June 25, 2014

MSFHR is pleased to announce the launch of the 2014 Health Services & Policy Research Support Network (HSPRSN) Partnership Program.

These awards, offered annually since 2005, support BC researchers in applying to peer-reviewed national or international competitions that require matching funds as a condition of award. Successful applicants will receive up to $80,000 per project to investigate issues that address provincial health system priorities.

A total of $260,000 is available to support successful applications to the 2014 competition. If there are more successful applications during 2014 than can be supported by the HSPRSN Partnership Program, funds will be allocated based on the rank order established by the funding partner.

> Apply to the 2014 HSPRSN Partnership Program

Currently, MSFHR has a partnership agreement with CIHR’s Partnerships for Health System Improvement (PHSI); however, other competitions requiring matching funds that are launched in 2014 will be considered as well. The funding partner(s) must be willing to enter into a partnership agreement with MSFHR for award administration.

The deadline for completed applications for matching funds from the CIHR-PHSI program is 4:30 p.m. (PST) on September 3, 2014. For full application details, download the competition guidelines.

HSPRSN Partnership awards help advance health services research in BC by leveraging funding and encouraging collaboration among researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers. Previously funded projects have focused on the:

  • Impact of community-based HIV/AIDS services on health care access and outcomes.
  • Factors influencing how older adults transition through long-term care.
  • Effectiveness and sustainability of a program to reduce falls and related injuries among home-care patients.