Awards

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Towards a provincial policy framework for substance use services in BC

Opioid use disorder is one of the most challenging forms of addiction facing the health care system in BC and is a major driver of the recent surge in illicit drug overdose deaths in the province. In the context of the current public health emergency, Provincial Health Services Authority agencies the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) and BC Mental Health & Substance Use Services (BCMHSUS) have identified an urgent need for a policy framework articulating the full range of therapeutic options for the optimal treatment and harm reduction measures those with opioid use disorder.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

Integrating equity and cultural safety lenses to promote Indigenous health in BC’s southern interior

Interior Health (IH) serves more than 215,000 km² of BC’s southern interior. This part of BC falls within the traditional, unceded territories of the Secwepemc, Ktunaxa, Syilx, Nlaka’pamux, Ulkatcho, Tsilhqot’in and St’at’imc peoples. Within these territories are people, both on and off reserve, who live in small urban, rural or remote communities. The First Nations, Metis, and Inuit populations served by IH are disproportionately affected by health inequities. 

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017

Understanding a potentially common upper airway disorder: Empty nose syndrome

Empty Nose Syndrome (ENS) is thought to be an unusual outcome of sinus surgery due to excessive loss of nasal tissues, particularly from a pair of structures called the inferior turbinates. Turbinates usually function to warm and humidify air flowing into the nose. Patients with ENS often have severe nasal symptoms and develop very poor quality of life as well as mental health problems. As a result of these mixed symptoms, ENS patients are often misdiagnosed, mismanaged, and left to their own devices.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

Understanding the aging HIV lung from dysbiosis to cell injury

Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are now living to older ages thanks to effective anti-HIV medicines. Despite these gains, many of them suffer from chronic lung disease that greatly impacts their ability to carry out their daily activities and impairs their quality of life. The type of lung disease they face is similar to what longtime smokers develop, a progressive narrowing of the airways and destruction of the lung. However, in HIV, the process appears to be accelerated and more severe.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

Canada-wide comparison of patient reported outcomes by complexity of radiotherapy technique for bone metastases

Radiotherapy (RT) is a common and cost effective treatment for patients with painful bone metastases (BoM). Complex and lengthy RT courses are increasingly used for BoM, despite substantial evidence and Choosing Wisely Canada guidelines recommending the use of single fraction RT (SFRT) over lengthy courses. Reluctance to adopt SFRT is based on lack of evidence of its effectiveness in patients ineligible for trials, such as those with poor performance status and BoM complicated by fracture or neurological compromise.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

Health related quality of life following road trauma: An emergency department inception cohort study

Each year in Canada, road trauma causes over 2,000 deaths and 10,000 serious injuries. Disability after an injury is a major public health concern, but the long term health outcome after road trauma is poorly investigated and based mostly on older research that does not reflect modern vehicle safety features or modern medical treatment. In addition, there is almost no research that helps health care providers know which patients are most likely to have a bad outcome following a crash, making it difficult to provide them with the care they require.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

Developing personalized anti-arrhythmic drug therapy for atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disorder. With an aging population, the number of people with AF is expected to rise dramatically. People with AF are twice as likely to die, are five times more likely to have a stroke, can develop worsening heart muscle function, and have a lower quality of life. We have learned that a person's genetic makeup, or DNA, has a major impact on their risk of developing AF; but we have a limited understanding of why, or how to use this information to treat people in a safer and more effective way.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

Towards individualized treatment for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC)

Pancreatic cancer kills almost 5,000 Canadians each year and if progress is not made to improve outcomes, the annual number of deaths will double by 2030. In 80% of patients, the cancer has spread at the time of diagnosis, and is not operable. Most of these patients die within one year due to the lack of effective therapies and the fact that clinicians have no clear guidance on which existing treatment option would work best for individual patients.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017

Women taking charge of changing childbirth in BC

Childbearing women in Canada are speaking out about their desire for respectful maternity care. The Vancouver Foundation funded Phase 1 of our provincial, community-led participatory action research project entitled "Changing Childbirth in BC: Women exploring access to high quality maternity care". A steering group of women from different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds worked with researchers and community agencies to study access to preferred models of maternity care and experiences of autonomy, respect, discrimination, or coercion when participating in a decision-making process.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017

Implementing concussion return to activity guidelines in primary care

Throughout the history of medicine, patients who had a disease that was poorly understood were advised to rest. As scientists and doctors learned more, early mobilization and active therapies (e.g., exercise) gradually replaced rest as the conventional treatment for a variety of medical conditions, such as chronic fatigue, whiplash, stroke, low back pain, and cardiac arrest. We have now reached this same juncture for concussion care. The proposed project aims to figure out how to support doctors in implementing new science-informed return to activity guidelines for concussion.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017

BCaLM research program: A safe & effective lyophilized fecal microbiota transplantation program for chronic gut disorders

Many Canadians live with debilitating chronic gut disorders such as Crohn's or ulcerative colitis (also known as inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD), Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), or both. These disorders lead to increased morbidity and reduce quality of life and productivity for patients and their families. One in every 150 Canadians has IBD, which is the highest rate worldwide. CDI is the number one cause of health care-associated infection (HAI) in Canada, and associated costs are approximately $300 million per year.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017

TEC4Home: Telehealth for emergency-community continuity of care connectivity via home monitoring

Patients with long term medical conditions like heart failure or chronic lung diseases typically get admitted to and discharged from hospitals frequently because their conditions fluctuate. For example, one out of four patients older than 65 with heart failure often needs to return to hospital within one month of a previous emergency room or hospital stay. Today, using electronic monitors, patients can measure their own blood pressure, weight, and blood oxygen from home, and send their measurements to doctors or nurses so they can supervise the patient's state of health.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017

Addressing morbidity, mortality and health care costs among patients evaluated for addiction care in acute care settings

Substance use disorders account for a significant burden of disease among Canadians and place an enormous burden on the acute care system. The annual cost of harms associated with substance use in Canada is estimated to be approximately $40 billion, with health care being the single largest contributor. In British Columbia (BC) there is clear urgency to address this challenge, given the recent steady increase in hospitalization rates due to substance use and the unprecedented number of drug overdose deaths prompting the recent declaration of a public health emergency.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

Study of Neurophysiology in Childhood Concussion (SONICC)

Dr. Julia Schmidt’s research investigates the neurophysiology of concussion (mild traumatic brain injury) in children and youth. Dr. Schmidt spent over 10 years as a clinician in brain injury rehabilitation (Australia and Canada) prior to engaging in research training in Australia. She seeks to better understand injuries in order to more effectively determine rehabilitation strategies.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

Movement strategies for transferring without falling in older people

Falls are the leading cause of injury-related hospitalizations among seniors and a major cause of disability and death. About 30 percent of people over age 65, and 50 percent of older people in residential care, experience at least one fall per year.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

Identifying prodromal signs of multiple sclerosis: a multi-centre approach

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease for which there is no known cure. It is among the most common causes of neurological disability in young adults in the Western world and affects approximately 2.3 million people worldwide, including an estimated 75,000 Canadians.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

The Effect of Psychosocial Stressors on Health Behaviours and Indicators of Cardiometabolic Risk in the Transition to Young Adulthood

Adolescence and young adulthood are critical periods for health promotion and disease prevention. Cardiometabolic risk (CMR) refers to a set of indicators that increase an individual’s risk for diabetes, heart disease or stroke. These indicators start to show predictive variability in adolescence and identification and implementation of early strategies for risk management can have significant long-term health benefits.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

‘APP’lying Supportive Movement: Trauma-Informed and Culturally Safe Physical Activity Programming for Young Pregnant and Parenting Women Marginalized by Poverty, Racism, and Trauma

Physical activity has been found to have numerous physical, emotional and psychological benefits, particularly for young pregnant/lone parenting women (YP/LP). Unfortunately, physical activity declines through adolescence, and women who are marginalized by poverty and racism have lower levels of leisure time.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

Understanding the evolution of expectant and new parents’ beliefs and behaviours about pediatric vaccination in British Columbia

Vaccines are the most effective way to prevent many communicable diseases, yet immunization rates in British Columbia are below the level required to mitigate outbreaks of infectious diseases. This can be partly explained by some parents’ doubts and concerns about pediatric vaccinations, termed “vaccine hesitancy”.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

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