Respiratory Tract

Breaking the link between obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease using a translational experimental approach

Previous research by Dr. Foster has illustrated that angiotensin receptor blockade can abolish the blood pressure response to intermittent hypoxia (IH), reduce oxidative stress and increase nitric oxide bioavailability. In addition, recent work suggests heightened peripheral neurovascular transduction in response to baroreflex activation.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2017

Understanding a potentially common upper airway disorder: Empty nose syndrome

Empty Nose Syndrome (ENS) is thought to be an unusual outcome of sinus surgery due to excessive loss of nasal tissues, particularly from a pair of structures called the inferior turbinates. Turbinates usually function to warm and humidify air flowing into the nose. Patients with ENS often have severe nasal symptoms and develop very poor quality of life as well as mental health problems. As a result of these mixed symptoms, ENS patients are often misdiagnosed, mismanaged, and left to their own devices.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

Understanding the aging HIV lung from dysbiosis to cell injury

Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are now living to older ages thanks to effective anti-HIV medicines. Despite these gains, many of them suffer from chronic lung disease that greatly impacts their ability to carry out their daily activities and impairs their quality of life. The type of lung disease they face is similar to what longtime smokers develop, a progressive narrowing of the airways and destruction of the lung. However, in HIV, the process appears to be accelerated and more severe.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

TEC4Home: Telehealth for emergency-community continuity of care connectivity via home monitoring

Patients with long term medical conditions like heart failure or chronic lung diseases typically get admitted to and discharged from hospitals frequently because their conditions fluctuate. For example, one out of four patients older than 65 with heart failure often needs to return to hospital within one month of a previous emergency room or hospital stay. Today, using electronic monitors, patients can measure their own blood pressure, weight, and blood oxygen from home, and send their measurements to doctors or nurses so they can supervise the patient's state of health.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017

Leading mHealth innovation and evidence in British Columbia: HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis patient engagement in care

In 2014, mobile phone subscriptions will outnumber the world’s population. Expanded mobile phone use presents a tremendous opportunity to engage patients in care, particularly those in remote or isolated situations.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Integrating clinical, functional and chemical genomics to understand lung cancer biology

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Contributing factors include the late stage of disease at the time of diagnosis and a scarcity of effective therapeutic strategies to treat advanced tumors. However, as our knowledge of lung cancer biology is increasing, targeted therapies have been developed to combat this devastating disease. These therapies target mutated components of key cellular pathways on which tumors have become dependent on for survival, yielding drastic initial response rates without the major side effects of traditional chemotherapies.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014
Health Category: 

Diesel exhaust as an adjuvant to allergen-mediated oxidative stress and immune response in the asthmatic lung

Asthma patients are at risk of potentially severe and sometimes lethal exacerbations. These exacerbations can be caused by a variety of triggers, such as infections or exposure to allergens. Diesel exhaust and other traffic-related constituents can also be inhaled along with the allergen. This multi-inhalant mixture results in immune reactions that are more complex than exposure to the allergen alone.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2011
Partners: 
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The role of the airway epithelium NLRP3 inflammasome in asthma pathogenesis

Asthma is a respiratory disease that afflicts more than two million Canadians. Asthmatics experience both airway inflammation and changes in the airway structure, called airway remodeling, when they inhale allergens, pollutants and other insults, and this leads to an exacerbation. The airway epithelium is the first site of contact for inhaled substances and has been shown to be different in asthmatics than in non-asthmatics.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2011
Partners: 

Childhood lung diseases: Infectious and inflammatory mechanisms

Lungs are for life. Unfortunately, the most frequent long-term illnesses in children and babies are respiratory system conditions. Children's lungs can be damaged in many ways: bacterial and viral infections, asthma, or faulty genes causing thick mucus to accumulate in the lungs of children with cystic fibrosis. Even the oxygen and artificial ventilation needed to sustain the lives of premature babies can cause lasting lung damage.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2011

Immunological basis for infections in prematurely born infants

Pre-term babies, those born before week 37 weeks of gestation, are more susceptible to invasive infections than full-term babies. The smallest babies born “extremely” premature (those born before 32 weeks, or approximately 1,500 grams or less of birth weight) suffer the greatest burden of infection among all age patient age groups in BC and other developed countries in general. About one in four “extremely” pre-term babies suffers from an invasive infection, which adds up to more than 8,760 new invasive infections in North America each year.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2011

Physical activity in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung condition that affects more than 75,000 British Columbians. People with COPD have a shortness of breath, chronic cough, and can experience difficulties with the activities of daily life, such as showering, walking, and social activities. Many people with COPD have regular flare-ups, or exacerbations, of their lung condition. These exacerbations result in a severe shortness of breath and overall weakness and fatigue and sometimes lead to long hospital stays.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2011
Health Category: 

Genetic Susceptibility to Inflammatory Airway Diseases

Chronic inflammatory airway diseases include asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis (CF). Together, these conditions contribute to an enormous burden of death and disability worldwide. It’s estimated that 10 to 15% of 13- to 14-year-olds in Canada are asthmatic. COPD affects close to half a million Canadians 35 and older, currently ranking 12th worldwide as a cause of lost quantity and quality of life and projected to rank 5th by the year 2020. CF is the most common, fatal genetic disease affecting Canadian children and adolescents.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2008
Health Category: 

COPD And Inflammation Team (CAIT)

In BC, more than 74,000 adults have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and 10,000 patients require hospitalization each year for related illnesses, such as chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Lung inflammation is the defining symptom of COPD, and may also be responsible for its progression and complications, including lung cancer and vascular disease. Currently, there are few effective therapies available to treat COPD.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2006
Health Category: 

Unclogging the Pediatric Emergency Room: Impact of Rapid Viral Diagnostics

To determine if use of a new program to support rapid diagnosis of viral respiratory infections in children will improve patient management and resource use in the Emergency Department by reducing wait time, improving decision making regarding diagnosis and decreasing antibiotic prescriptions.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2005
Health Category: 

Respiratory Sleep Disorders Research Unit

Respiratory sleep disorders affect more than 100,000 people in BC, with significant costs to the health care system and to the quality of life for those affected. A patient with a respiratory sleep disorder may stop breathing hundreds of times during the night, waking momentarily each time breathing resumes. As a result, they chronically get very little sleep.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2004
Health Category: 
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