The effect of a telehealth chair-based exercise intervention on motor function in stroke survivors with a mobility impairment

Physical activity plays a key role in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. However, approximately 7% of Canadians live with a mobility impairment, decreasing their ability to participate in daily activities and subsequently increasing their time spent in sedentary behaviours (sitting). Living a sedentary lifestyle is associated with poor health and risk of cardiovascular disease, particularly in those with a compromised health. In the elderly, chair-based exercises are shown to improve mobility function and quality of life, with general compliance shown to be better than standing or dynamic exercises. During the current COVID-19 pandemic, there is limited access to group activities and therapies due to social distancing requirements. Therefore, telehealth (videocall) delivery of exercise interventions is of great importance in helping to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Our project will investigate the effect of delivering a telehealth chair-based exercise intervention on motor function in stroke survivors with a mobility impairment (unable to walk without assistance of one person). Secondary outcomes include balance and quality of life. The results can help develop telehealth interventions that can be delivered in rural communities.