Co-creating Fraser Health’s partner-centred long-term care and assisted living research priorities

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown failings in the care provided to older adults in care homes and a clear need for the voices of residents and their family to inform positive change. A group of residents, their family and friend carers, staff, physicians, nurses, leaders and researchers in care homes at Fraser Health will work together to agree on the most important research questions for people that live and work in care homes to improve the care that is given. Priority setting activities will be held with the goal to discuss key research topics and decide together the most important research questions in care homes at Fraser Health. Undertaking these activities also will build strong relationships between the different partners. The activities will be conducted so that the different partners in care homes, such as residents, their family and friends and staff, can contribute to the talks about research that is most important to them. The different research partners will also talk about plans for ongoing research projects to answer the top research questions together in the care homes at Fraser Health.


Team members: Adriaan Windt (Fraser Health); Laura Kadowaki (Simon Fraser University); Lucy Kervin (Simon Fraser University); Emma Leong (Kwantlen Polytechnic University); Annette Berndt (Fraser Health); Catherine Youngren (Fraser Health); Akber Mithani (Fraser Health); Suzanne Fox (Fraser Health); Clayon Hamilton (Fraser Health and Simon Fraser University); Valorie Crooks (Simon Fraser University); Nick Petropolis (Fraser Health); Amber Jarvie (Fraser Health); Gita Rafiee (Fraser Health); Anita Wahl (Fraser Health); Dan Levitt (Tabor Home Society)

Understanding critical care nurses’ prioritization of patient care

Delirium is a complication of a critical care (CC) admission. Although usually reversible, it can lead to long-term impaired thinking, poor mental health and increased mortality. Upwards of 80% of people admitted to CC will experience delirium. Research has been done to understand delirium and to prevent it. Factors that are known to help prevent delirium include a day-night routine, encouraging movement, and reducing sedating medications. CC nurses have control over many of these factors, but implementing strategies to prevent delirium remains sub-optimal. The lack of information about how CC nurses prioritize care to prevent delirium in the busy healthcare system leaves limited guidance for making change. This study aims to examine how CC nurses prioritize delirium-related patient care and to identify challenges and opportunities for change. The research will use surveys and interviews to gather data. This research is important for identifying gaps and opportunities to implement delirium prevention strategies needed to improve patient outcomes. The findings will allow CC teams to create a system to support a change in practice to improve the care and outcomes of patients.