The acute impact of spinal cord injury on cardiac function, and novel hemodynamic management in SCI patients

Principal Investigator: 
University: 
University of British Columbia
Faculty: 
Faculty of Education
Department: 
School of Kinesiology
Award Type: 

Following acute spinal cord injury (SCI), one of the only presently available neuroprotective strategies is to try and optimize management of spinal cord blood flow. This treatment specifically aims to immediately increase blood flow to the injured spinal cord tissue to prevent the spread of injury to surrounding spinal cord tissues.
Currently, vasopressors are administered to increase blood pressure to a similar threshold in all patients; however, its efficacy in improving neurological outcomes has not been consistent, and in some patients has been found to actually worsen outcomes. A more optimized and individualized approach to blood flow management in SCI patients is needed.

High-thoracic SCI immediately impairs the brainstem and neural control of the heart. Our pilot data suggest this decentralization of the heart immediately impairs cardiac function, which could have significant implications for the acute management of blood flow in SCI patients. Dr. Williams will investigate the immediate and acute cardiac responses to high-thoracic SCI, and determine whether improvements to cardiac function can improve spinal cord blood flow and neurological outcomes in SCI patients. 

Dr. Williams will conduct translational studies utilizing a porcine model of SCI. She will test the efficacy of potential novel management strategies, including restoring cardiac function alone or in combination with vasopressor therapy. A simultaneous study will look at acutely injured individuals with SCI at Vancouver General Hospital, examining heart function during the first three days after injury.

To date, very little work has characterized the impact of SCI on cardiac function in the initial period following injury. Combining invasive and integrative studies in pigs and humans provides us with the unique opportunity to conduct highly translatable studies that could have an immediate impact on SCI patient outcomes.

 

Research Pillar: 
Host Institution: 
University of British Columbia
Research Location: 
International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries
Supervisor: 
Christopher West
Co-Supervisor: 
Brian Kwon
Year: 
2017