Clinical

Brain and behaviour: mechanisms of human attention in patient and healthy populations

Attention problems are a major source of disability associated with a wide range of disorders, including autism, stroke and schizophrenia. In British Columbia alone, hundreds of millions of dollars are spent each year by the health system for the treatment and rehabilitation of people with disorders of attention. And this does not take into account the additional costs for the education system or the toll on patients and families.

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2001

Development and testing of a client specific wheelchair mobility outcome measure

Wheelchairs that don't fit properly can cause discomfort, medical complications and limit people from getting around. Despite the fact that more than 150,000 Canadians rely on wheelchairs as their primary means of mobility, research in this area is often overlooked. While working as an occupational therapist in a long-term care facility, Dr. Bill Miller recognized the lack of tools for assessing and measuring people's ability to function in wheelchairs, and is now developing a specific tool for this purpose. He hopes the tool will ultimately improve quality of life for wheelchair users.

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2001

Neurocognition, movement disorder and corticostriatal function in first-episode schizophrenia

For people living with schizophrenia, anti-psychotic medications can help control delusions and hallucinations. However, it is far more difficult to treat schizophrenia's neurocognitive effects, such as disordered thinking and problems with memory and planning. Dr. Donna Lang is working toward uncovering the underlying causes of these devastating symptoms. Her previous research included a study comparing risperidone - a new-generation drug - to traditional anti-psychotics, in terms of how they affect deep-brain structures called the basal ganglia.

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2001

Estimation Of Cochlear Thresholds Using Multiple Auditory Steady-State Responses In Infant and Adult Subjects

Susan Small's research examines an advanced method to test hearing in infants, young children and others who cannot be assessed through traditional testing techniques. The method focuses on Auditory Steady State Responses (ASSRs), objective measures of response to sound stimuli in the areas of the brain involved in hearing. Past research on ASSRs, which test multiple frequencies in both ears simultaneously, has shown their reliability in measuring air-conducted sounds. Small is assessing the method's reliability in estimating bone-conducted sounds.

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2001

Impact of a Targeted Intervention on Parental Administration of Post-operative Analgesia

In her Masters research, Rebecca Pillai Riddell identified significant factors that predict parental attitudes toward administering pain medication to children after surgery. Now she's taking this work one step further by recruiting parents of children undergoing day care surgery at B.C.'s Children's Hospital for a project assessing the effectiveness of a targeted intervention designed to dispel common parental myths and misconceptions about proper pain management.

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2001

Issues in the diagnosis and treatment of viral co-infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C (HCV)

While an estimated 30 per cent of British Columbians living with HIV are also infected with Hepatitis C, which is becoming a leading cause of death among HIV-positive people, the issue of co-infection has received relatively little attention. Paula Braitstein hopes to change that by focusing her research on how to most effectively treat people who are co-infected with the diseases.

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2001

Bone Health in Adult Women: The Relevance of Dietary Restraint, Cortisol Excretion and Nutrition-Related Stress

Candice Rideout is fascinated with bones. Despite a perception that bones are static once we're fully grown, they're actually ever-changing, which intrigues Candice. She is also interested in how nutritional behaviours affect bone health. The two interests come together in her research. Candice, who transferred from a Masters to PhD program, is examining bone health in adult women, looking specifically at possible links between dietary restraint, stress and bone density. The first phase of the research involved a broad survey of more than 1000 healthy postmenopausal women.

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2001

Pain communication during infancy and early childhood: When cry becomes a speech act

Elizabeth Stanford (Job) has focused her research on understanding and improving assessment of children's pain, by learning more about how children express pain, and how pain expression changes from infancy to early childhood. In her Master's research she pursued three major projects that provided insights into the nature of children's pain experience and how to improve measurement strategies. Two of her studies examined the language children use when experiencing painful events.

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2001

The involvement of phosphatidylcholine in the development of hepatic steatosis in children with cystic fibrosis

Alice Chen hopes to achieve a better understanding of what causes liver disease in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Liver disease - the second most common cause of death for people with CF - may result from depletion of choline (a water soluble B vitamin) in CF patients. An inability to properly absorb phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is found in food such as organ meats and egg yolks, may cause choline depletion and may ultimately lead to accumulation of fat in the liver. To test this hypothesis, Chen is studying a group of 50 children with CF, along with 10 healthy children.

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2001

The influence of alcohol on mood and cognition

Treatment of alcoholism is complicated by the fact that many alcoholics also suffer from depression. Ekin Blackwell wants to contribute to more effective prevention and treatment of alcoholism by studying alcohol's mood-enhancing properties, and identifying individuals who are especially sensitive to these properties. In her Master’s research, Ekin focused on clinically defining the characteristics of these sensitive individuals to gain insights into factors that influence the development of problematic drinking.

Primary Investigator: 
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Year: 
2001

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