Clinical

Advancing Healthcare Diagnostics for Neurodegenerative Disorders

Alzheimer’s disease causes progressive neurological decline and substantially decreases the quality of life of patients and their caregivers. In 2011, 747,000 Canadians had Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. With a rapidly aging population, this figure is projected to rise to 1.4 million by 2040, costing $293 billion/year, thus representing an urgent and rapidly growing healthcare issue.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

Personalized genomics for improving drug safety: From discovery to implementation.

Medications ideally improve patient health, occasionally with mild or moderate side effects. But sometimes patients have significant damaging responses to drugs, events called adverse drug reactions (ADRs). In Canada, there are 87,000 – 200,000 debilitating or life-threatening ADRs, which cause 3,600 – 10,000 deaths each year. The problem is worse in children, where ADRs are three times more life threatening than in adults.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

The development of novel blood protein biomarkers to enable precision care in cystic fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal genetic disease, affecting one out of every 3,600 children born in Canada. In 2013 alone, Canadians with cystic fibrosis spent about 25,000 days in hospital, mainly due to pulmonary exacerbations, which cause respiratory distress due to excessive mucus production, infection, and inflammation in the lungs.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

BRIDGE-MTB: Bringing Integrated Data, Genomics, and Evaluation to Mycobacteria and Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) and non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections (NTMs) are bacterial infections that create serious problems in BC. Treating TB costs the health system nearly $13 million per year, and NTMs are emerging as a new and poorly-understood threat, especially in BC’s seniors.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

A computer-assisted method for dental implant procedures using drilling sounds

A dental implant is a screw-like device that is surgically placed in the jawbone to provide a foundation for artificial teeth. This involves precise removal of bone using drills, which is often risky because of proximity to delicate structures such as the maxillary sinus, orofacial nerves, and blood vessels. Mistakes in the drilling path may result in permanent nerve damage, life threatening hemorrhage, or injuries to adjacent teeth.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

Mutant cell-free DNA as a non-invasive blood test to monitor pancreatic cancer

Close to 5,000 Canadians are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer every year and it is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related deaths in Canada. Unfortunately, a majority of these patients die within a year of their diagnosis, due in part to late diagnosis and tumour resistance to chemotherapy. In addition, most patients who are successfully treated eventually recur and succumb to the disease.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

A telehealth intervention to promote healthy lifestyles after stroke: The Stroke COACH

Stroke is often associated with low levels of physical activity and poor nutrition habits and with related conditions such as obesity, hypertension and diabetes. Within five years of the initial stroke, 30 percent of stroke survivors will suffer a recurrent stroke.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

Using aerobic exercise to enhance motor learning and cortical excitability after stroke

The severity of motor impairments due to stroke vary markedly in different people, and with therapy, a degree of recovery is possible. Understanding the underlying neural mechanisms supporting motor recovery from stroke would inform development of more effective therapies.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

Characterizing Arm Recovery in People with Severe Stroke (CARPSS)

In Canada, there are over 50,000 new strokes reported every year. The prevalence and severity of subsequent upper limb disability is increasing and the prospect of complete recovery is poor. Stroke survivors who lack early indicators of a good prognosis, such as movement at the shoulder or wrist, are considered unlikely to regain much arm function through rehabilitation.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

Alteration of intestinal microbiota composition and function by co-trimoxazole use and the effect of these changes on growth in HIV-infected children

Malnutrition in early life underlies almost half of all child deaths globally and has long-term negative effects on education and productivity. HIV infection further compounds these effects in sub-Saharan Africa. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends daily use of the antibiotic co-trimoxazole (CTX) to prevent infections in HIV-infected children.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

How is the motor learning capacity of a skilled walking task affected after an incomplete spinal cord injury?

Many people who have an incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) have the potential to improve their ability to walk. Current training strategies are limited in their ability to target skilled walking tasks (e.g. stairs and obstacles).

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

Behavioural and neural correlates of placebo responses in healthy and clinical populations

Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research/Lotte and John Hecht Memorial Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellowship Award

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

Detecting neuroplasticity after spinal cord injury: Implications for neuropathic pain

Current interventions for neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) have proven largely ineffective, an unfavorable outcome that can be partly attributed to poor understanding of mechanisms.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Omics2TreatID: Improving diagnosis and treatment of intellectual disability via an integrated -omics approach

Intellectual disability (ID) affects two-three percent of children and adults, or 140-210 million people worldwide. Defined strictly as low IQ, ID can have devastating lifelong effects on all aspects of life. The health cost of ID equals that of stroke, heart disease and cancer combined. The burden on families is incalculable. In most cases of ID, we do not know the cause (the majority is genetic), and so cannot provide effective treatment. ID can be an unchangeable fate for a child.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

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