Clinical

Investigation of aging-related pathways associated with an increased risk of emphysema in HIV-infected patients

Because antiretroviral therapy has enabled people to live longer, those with HIV now face a growing epidemic of age-related chronic diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The reason for this increased risk, however, remains unknown. Compelling evidence suggests that HIV infection triggers an inflammatory process which causes the premature aging of inflammatory and structural cells due to cell exhaustion from repeated divisions and oxidative stress.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2013

Structural and functional correlates of neuroplastic change associated with stroke

In Canada, stroke is the third leading cause of neurological disease and death. Although improved acute care has resulted in greater survival rates, an increased number of Canadians suffer long-term neurological disability and a decreased quality of life following a stroke. With an aging Canadian population, the need for efficient and effective diagnostic tools and rehabilitation strategies are critical so that stroke survivors can maintain independence and a high quality of life.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2013

Evolutionary dynamics and driver mutations underlying histological transformation and treatment resistance in follicular lymphoma

Lymphoid cancers arise from lymphocytes, a subset of white blood cells, and represent the fifth most common cause of cancer. Follicular lymphoma (FL) is a common subtype of lymphoid cancers. For ten percent of FL patients, the disease either does not respond to primary therapy or progresses early after treatment. These patients have poor outcomes and often require aggressive therapeutic interventions.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2013

New indications for old drugs: Do statins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or proton pump inhibitors impact long-term disease progression in multiple sclerosis?

The most widely prescribed drugs for multiple sclerosis (beta interferons) have been shown to be only partially effective while carrying high costs and adverse side-effects. However, statins, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are effective against lipids, blood pressure, and acid, respectively, are safe, relatively inexpensive, and also have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties that may be beneficial in the treatment of MS.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2013
Health Category: 

Mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in children with mental health conditions

Prescriptions of second-generation antipsychotic  (SGA) medication for children in British Columbia increased 22-fold from 1996 to 2010. These medications treat the underlying mental health issues (e.g. psychosis, depression, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder) but often come with side-effects, including metabolic syndrome.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2013

Examining executive functions as mediators of a mental and social enrichment intervention for older adults with chronic stroke

Significant proportions of stroke survivors suffer long-term physical disability and are predisposed to sedentary lifestyles. This limits their performance of activities necessary for independent living in the community and contributes to increased risk for recurrent stroke and heart disease. Dr. John Best recognizes that intervention strategies are needed to motivate stroke survivors to engage in routine physical activity and to optimize their physical and motor functions.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2013
Health Category: 

Characterizing the impact of silent lesions on stroke recovery using multimodal neuroimaging

Half of individuals recovering from a stroke have some form of impaired cognition, which hampers their independence. One possible contributor to impaired cognition after stroke is the presence of small “silent” lesions, which are detected in up to 28 percent of individuals with stroke.

Currently, there is little data describing the impact of silent lesions on stroke recovery. This study will determine if impaired cognition after stroke is associated with the presence and quantity of silent lesions.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2013

Translation of next-generation sequencing to HIV treatment and prevention in British Columbia

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is the automation of high-throughput DNA sequencing on a massive scale that is rapidly transforming biology and medicine. It can enable laboratories to detect small, but clinically significant, numbers of drug-resistant viruses in blood samples from infected individuals.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2012
Partners: 

Manipulating the trajectory of the human fetal, newborn & infant immune system

Millions of newborns and infants die each year from infectious diseases. Many of these deaths are preventable, and analysis of the immune development of children can help define paths for medical intervention that may save lives.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2012

Understanding tumor microenvironment interactions in lymphoid cancers: Translation into improved treatment outcome prediction and development of personalized therapies

Malignant lymphomas are the fifth most frequent cancer in humans, affecting patients of all ages. Despite generally effective treatments, a significant number of patients still die from the progressive disease. Interactions of the malignant cells with cells of the tumor microenvironment are increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in the development of many lymphoma subtypes. However, the clinical potential of an improved understanding of microenvironment-related biology remains largely untapped.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2012
Health Category: 

Biomechanically-informed non-invasive treatment for knee osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of physical disability in adults worldwide and is associated with a significant personal and economic burden. It is estimated that one in eight Canadian adults currently have osteoarthritis, which results in $10.2 billion in annual health-care costs and an additional $17.3 billion in economic impact due to loss of employment productivity and other indirect health-care costs.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2012

Training parents as friendship coaches for children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a syndrome marked by inattention and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity that affects 5-8 percent of Canadian youth. It makes up the most frequent referral for children’s mental health services and is associated with considerable psychosocial morbidity. A significant aspect of the impairment in ADHD is the difficulty these children face in getting along with peers. More than half of children with this condition are severely disliked by their peers or do not have a single friend.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2012
Health Category: 

Psycho-social predictors of physical activity in community-dwelling and vulnerable seniors: Linking daily life processes with long-term health outcomes

Canada is an aging society, and the proportion of Canadians older than 65 is estimated to double within the next 10 years. It is well known that aging is associated with declining health, but there is also tremendous variability in aging outcomes. While physical activity can reduce the risk of many age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, Canadian seniors have low rates of physical activity.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2012
Health Category: 

Relationship of Neonatal Pain and Early Brain Development of Preterm Infants on Motor Outcomes at 18 months

Between 2005 and 2009, more than 16,000 infants in British Columbia were born prematurely. Prematurely born infants are at increased risk for developing motor problems that, in many cases, significantly interfere with daily life and school performance. This degree of motor difficulty is often referred to as developmental coordination disorder, or DCD. Children with DCD struggle with many typical tasks, such as tying shoes, riding a bike, handwriting or participating in sports.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2011
Health Category: 

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