Clinical

Diesel exhaust as an adjuvant to allergen-mediated oxidative stress and immune response in the asthmatic lung

Asthma patients are at risk of potentially severe and sometimes lethal exacerbations. These exacerbations can be caused by a variety of triggers, such as infections or exposure to allergens. Diesel exhaust and other traffic-related constituents can also be inhaled along with the allergen. This multi-inhalant mixture results in immune reactions that are more complex than exposure to the allergen alone.

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Year: 
2011
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Near infrared spectroscopy of the bladder: Novel application for evaluation and monitoring of bladder function in patients with spinal cord injury

An estimated 86,500 people are currently living with spinal cord injury (SCI) in Canada, and approximately 4,300 more will experience SCI each year. In persons with SCI, the bladder can't receive or send the signals required for normal organ function, and 80 percent of persons with SCI are affected by acute or chronic urinary tract complications that negatively influence their health, quality of life and impact their life expectancy.

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Year: 
2011

Finding a cure for tendinopathy: a translational biology approach

Repetitive-use tendinopathy, formerly known as tendonitis, is a major cause of repetitive strain injury (RSI). The occupational costs of RSI are enormous: work-related injuries cost Canada $8.6 billion annually and an estimated one-third of workers' compensation costs in industry are due to RSI of soft tissues, particularly tendons. In 2001, 2.3 million Canadians reported an RSI, and the average time lost from work per case of tendon-related injuries was 79 days (Source: StatsCanada 2001).

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2011
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Childhood lung diseases: Infectious and inflammatory mechanisms

Lungs are for life. Unfortunately, the most frequent long-term illnesses in children and babies are respiratory system conditions. Children's lungs can be damaged in many ways: bacterial and viral infections, asthma, or faulty genes causing thick mucus to accumulate in the lungs of children with cystic fibrosis. Even the oxygen and artificial ventilation needed to sustain the lives of premature babies can cause lasting lung damage.

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Year: 
2011

SALOME (Study to Assess Long-term Opioid Medication Effectiveness): double blind randomized controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of diacetylmorphine vs. hydromorphone for the treatment of …

Injection-drug users are extremely susceptible to drug-related health risks, including HIV, hepatitis C and overdose. Although treatments for drug addiction are available, they are not always effective for those with the most severe cases of addiction. A key issue is many members of this vulnerable population remain outside the health care system, which exposes injection-drug users and those in their immediate communities to drug-related health risks.

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Year: 
2011
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Beyond VO2peak: Understanding exercise-induced in cardiovascular function after stroke

Stroke is the leading cause of neurological disability in Canada. Most stroke survivors have a number of other related conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure, which contribute to their risk of additional strokes. Exercise not only improves fitness, it also has the potential to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke.

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Year: 
2011
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Immunological basis for infections in prematurely born infants

Pre-term babies, those born before week 37 weeks of gestation, are more susceptible to invasive infections than full-term babies. The smallest babies born “extremely” premature (those born before 32 weeks, or approximately 1,500 grams or less of birth weight) suffer the greatest burden of infection among all age patient age groups in BC and other developed countries in general. About one in four “extremely” pre-term babies suffers from an invasive infection, which adds up to more than 8,760 new invasive infections in North America each year.

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Year: 
2011

The role of emotion regulation in borderline personality disorder and self-injury

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is among the most complex, misunderstood, and stigmatized mental health problems. It is a serious psychiatric condition characterized by instability in relationships, emotions, identity, and behaviour that often induces intense emotional suffering and places affected individuals at high risk of suicide and self-injury. Approximately 10% of individuals affected by BPD die by suicide, 75% have attempted suicide, and 70-80% self-injure. BPD is also a significant concern for the public health-care system.

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Year: 
2011
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OCD translational multi-modal research program

According to the World Health Organization, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is one of the top 10 causes of disability. The disorder often begins in childhood and interferes with normal development. This disabling mental illness affects approximately 2 – 3 percent of British Columbians and, although treatable, is often under diagnosed.

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Year: 
2011
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Physical activity in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung condition that affects more than 75,000 British Columbians. People with COPD have a shortness of breath, chronic cough, and can experience difficulties with the activities of daily life, such as showering, walking, and social activities. Many people with COPD have regular flare-ups, or exacerbations, of their lung condition. These exacerbations result in a severe shortness of breath and overall weakness and fatigue and sometimes lead to long hospital stays.

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Year: 
2011
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Investigating clinical outcomes from highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) among HIV-seropositive Aboriginal people in British Columbia

The development of effective HIV/AIDS treatment has resulted in dramatic improvements in the health of people infected with the virus. Taken regularly, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) interrupts the viral life cycle, suppresses the level of HIV in a patient's bloodstream, and promotes health improvements. The recent finding that individuals undergoing effective treatment are far less likely to transmit the virus to others has spurred the development of a new strategy aimed at preventing new HIV infections.

Primary Investigator: 
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Year: 
2011
Health Category: 

Improving chronic cardiovascular disease management in ethnocultural patients

Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Long-term disease management approaches are effective at reducing the risk of death and disability in patients with cardiovascular disease. Canadians of South Asian and Chinese ancestry are more likely to die from heart disease or stroke than other Canadians and there is emerging evidence that these groups may have poor chronic disease management.

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Year: 
2011

The anti-inflammatory effects of exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

The number of individuals suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD is on the rise in Canada and around the world. COPD, is an inflammatory disease primarily associated with lung inflammation. Inflammation also extends beyond the lungs, and the presence of inflammatory factors in the blood causes blood vessel and heart disease, increasing a COPD patient's risk of heart attack and stroke. Exercise training is known to have anti-inflammatory effects that are beneficial in the treatment and prevention of a number of chronic conditions.

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Year: 
2011

Role of cerebral blood flow in the pathophysiology of central and obstructive sleep apnea

Sleep apnea occurs when a person repeatedly stops breathing for a short period of time while they sleep. This common disorder affects about 20 per cent of Canadians. During sleep apnea episodes, blood oxygen levels fall, resulting in persistent low levels of oxygen, called hypoxia. Consequently, people with sleep apnea commonly experience adverse health outcomes, including high blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes. Preliminary findings from Dr.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2011

Physical Activity, Femoroacetabular Impingement(FAI) and Hip Pain: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

Osteoarthritis occurs when cartilage (the gristle that lines the ends of the bones) is damaged. It is the most common form of hip arthritis and is responsible for more than 90 percent of hip replacements. Recently, subtle deformities of the hip have been linked to hip osteoarthritis, and it is now believed that these deformities, combined with certain types of physical activities, such as hockey, soccer and bicycling, are one of the major causes of damage to the hip.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2011

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