Match Funding

Evaluation of innovative risk mitigation services in the context of dual crises of COVID-19 and overdose among people who use opioids in Vancouver, BC

Through funding from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) and MSFHR, Principal Investigators Dr. Kanna Hayashi, Research Scientist at the BC Centre on Substance Use (BCCSU) and St. Paul’s Hospital Chair in Substance Use Research and Assistant professor in the Faculty of Health Science at Simon Fraser University (SFU) along with Dr.

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Year: 
2020

Tracking the Prevalence and Incidence of Modifiable Suicide Risk Factors During the COVID-19 Pandemic to Inform Targeted Suicide Prevention in British Columbia

Problem: Half of Canadians report worsened mental health since the COVID-19 pandemic began disrupting our lives this Spring. These impacts, combined with rising prevalence of known suicide risk factors such as unemployment and financial hardship, social isolation, alcohol and substance use, relationship strain and domestic violence, have raised concerns that of rising suicide risk in the Canadian population. Canada loses 3,800 to 4,500 lives to suicide each year. Suicide death and bereavement confer long-term psychological and social risk to families and communities.

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Year: 
2020

Addressing the dual public health crises of COVID-19 and overdose

A team led by Dr. Amanda Slaunwhite, Senior Scientist with the BC Centre for Disease Control and an adjunct professor in the School of Population and Public Health, were awarded $75,000 from the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research and $777,439 from CIHR as part of the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Rapid Research Funding Opportunity. The researchers will assess the impact of the new risk-mitigation guidance that permits prescribing of pharmaceutical alternatives to the toxic drug supply.

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2020

Extracellular Vesicle Associated Glycans as a Novel Platform for Breast Cancer Detection

Breast cancer is the most common cancer amongst women in Canada. Breast cancer cells shed tiny pieces of themselves into the blood stream called extracellular vesicles. These tiny pieces, or cell fragments, are different from those of a healthy breast cell and we think they could be used to detect a breast cancer at its earliest stage. Importantly, we can isolate and study these fragments from the blood of healthy females and breast cancer patients. We think that by looking at the sugars and proteins they contain we will find markers that could help in the detection of breast cancer.

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2020

The EARLY study: Economic evAluation of a novel pRostate cancer gLYcan-based diagnostic tool

Early detection of prostate cancer uses methods that are controversial and lead to uncertainty in care; this leads to a lot of overdiagnosis and overtreatment in men who are healthy or have inactive disease. We recently developed a test using a sugar found on aggressive cancer cells that acts as a biomarker to detect high-risk cancer in patients and support biopsy decision-making. But, for this test to be taken up in Canada to improve patient care, it needs to be evaluated for its potential value for money for the healthcare payer.

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2020

Towards clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics to improve the treatment of people with depression in BC

In Canada, more than 1 in 10 people will suffer a major form of depression at some point in their lives. There are many effective treatments for depression, including drug therapy. Finding a medication that both works and does not cause severe side effects is often a matter of trial-and-error. This may contribute to the high non-adherence rates and, subsequently, to poorer health outcomes and increased costs. An individual’s genetic makeup is thought to be partly related to whether particular drugs work and whether there are side effects with the drug.

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2020

A scoping review of literature on different models of allocating funds to facilitate integrated care

Jason Sutherland is Professor in UBC’s Centre for Health Services and Policy Research in the School of Population and Public Health. He is also a Scholar of the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research.

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2019

Scaling up Trauma and Violence Informed Outreach with Women Affected by Violence

This 7-year, multi-site implementation project is funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), Partnership Grants competition. Through community-based research design and implementation we aim to address an urgent priority of providing access and receipt of services among women and youth affected by violence who experience the worst severity in terms of types, duration, frequency and impact of violence for their lives.

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2018

An Inter-provincial comparison of innovative programs that help individuals and families affected by life-limiting chronic illnesses navigate end-of-life

Dr. Kelli Stajduhar is working with a team of researchers across Canada including PI R. Urquart (NS), and Co-Is K. Pfaff (ON), G. Johnston (NS), B. Lawson (NS), C. Tschupruk (NS), and G. Warner (NS). MSFHR has contributed matched-funding to support the CIHR Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research funding.

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2018

Translating research into practice: Investigating the impact of Alzheimer's disease diagnostics in Canada (IMPACT-AD)

Early and accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is critical as timely access to health care and community services has the potential to slow disease progression and improve quality of life. Current approaches for diagnosis rely on traditional imaging tests and observation of the signs and symptoms of the disease. Adding the measure of proteins found in cerebrospinal fluid (biomarkers) has been shown to help correctly identify the disease and predict those with mild symptoms that are likely to progress to dementia; however, such testing is not readily available in Canada.

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2017

Supporting integration through primary health care teams: A comparative policy analysis across four Canadian provinces

MSFHR is contributing match-funding towards Dr. Nelly Oelke’s research, awarded through SPOR Networks in Primary and Integrated Health Care Innovations – Provincial/ Territorial Comparative Program and Policy grant. Dr. Oelke is undertaking this pan-Canadian project across four provinces (BC, AB, ON, and QC) with a team of researchers including the following PIs: S. Montesanti (AB), S. Johnston (ON), and M. Breton (QC).

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Year: 
2018

Cultural agility in Northern BC's healthcare system: Increasing Indigenous employment participation and responsiveness to Indigenous well-being

Primary Investigator Dr. Sarah de Leeuw and Co-Investigator Dr. Margo Greenwood, together with northern and provincial partners, lead a five-year, 1.3 million research project focused on further enhancement of Indigenous health and the healthcare climate in northern BC.

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2018

Targeting amyloid propagation in Alzheimer disease: Structures, immunology and extracellular vesicle topology

Dr. Neil Cashman is one of five BC researchers supported through the British Columbia Alzheimer’s Research Award. Established in 2013 by the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR), Genome British Columbia (Genome BC), The Pacific Alzheimer Research Foundation (PARF) and Brain Canada, the goal of the $7.5 million fund is to discover the causes of and seek innovative treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

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2013

Propagated protein misfolding of SOD1 in ALS: Exemplar for neurodegeneration

MSFHR supported Dr. Neil Cashman’s award as one of two interprovincial teams from across Canada funded through Brain Canada’s Multi-Investigator Research Initiative (MIRI) in 2013. The MIRI supports the research of multidisciplinary teams and aims to accelerate novel and transformative research that will fundamentally change the understanding of nervous system function and dysfunction and its impact on health. MSFHR committed funding over three years to support the work of Cashman’s BC-based research activities and research led by fellow MIRI recipient Dr.

Primary Investigator: 
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Year: 
2013

Integrating paramedics into primary care to optimize patient time in the community at end of life

MSFHR is providing matching funds to support Drs. Sabrina Wong and Jennifer Kryworuchko’s BC-based research as part of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) Network in Primary and Integrated Health Care Innovation (PIHCI) initiative. The multi-province research team was funded through a SPOR PIHCI Provincial/Territorial Comparative Program and Policy Analysis Grant. MSFR is also supporting Dr. Kimberlyn McGrail’s PIHCI Comparative Program and Policy Analysis grant.

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Year: 
2016

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