Scholar Award

Intravascular Materials to Control Thrombosis and Haemostasis

Uncontrolled bleeding is a leading cause of death worldwide. Specifically, postpartum hemorrhage leads to maternal death in 1-2 percent of all births in low-resource settings, while hemorrhage due to trauma is the largest killer of young people worldwide. Conversely, undesired clotting, or thrombosis, is a leading killer of Canadians because it causes strokes and heart attacks. 

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

BRIDGE-MTB: Bringing Integrated Data, Genomics, and Evaluation to Mycobacteria and Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) and non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections (NTMs) are bacterial infections that create serious problems in BC. Treating TB costs the health system nearly $13 million per year, and NTMs are emerging as a new and poorly-understood threat, especially in BC’s seniors.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

Detecting neuroplasticity after spinal cord injury: Implications for neuropathic pain

Current interventions for neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) have proven largely ineffective, an unfavorable outcome that can be partly attributed to poor understanding of mechanisms.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Facilitating the implementation and monitoring of child rights in Canada: a rights-based approach to child health promotion

Developmental outcomes of childhood are strong determinants of lifelong health. Children’s development is influenced by their  environments and the quality of experiences within those  environments. Through a series of reports, the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UN-CRC) advises on ways to  improve the state of children’s rights and health. However, Canada’s reports are compilation of reports from all jurisdictions, and suffer from a few shortcomings as they lack coordination and fail to address all issues in all regions.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Socio-economic risk environments and health among people who use drugs in British Columbia

Socio-economic well-being, which encompasses safe and sufficient income generating activity as well as adequate material resources, is intrinsically linked to health. Among marginalized people who use drugs (PWUD) who are living with or at risk of HIV/AIDS infection, socio-economic well-being is often precarious. However, the socio-economic risk environment of PWUD and its negative health impacts have not been fully examined.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

A community-based research program focused on “Adding Life to Later Years”

In 2011, an estimated 5 million Canadians were 65 years of age or older, a number that is expected to double in the next 25 years. The majority of older adults prefer to live in their family home for as long as possible. However, aging in place - the desire to remain living in the community, with some level of independence - is only possible with provision of adequate housing, transportation, recreational opportunities, health and home services and amenities that facilitate physical activity, social interaction and cultural engagement.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Socio-demographic and behavioural factors: Impact on cardiac patients' access to and outcomes from care

Dr. Mackay’s program of research aims to explore the effects of ethnicity on certain critical junctures in cardiac care: seeking treatment in an Emergency Department when having symptoms of acute coronary syndrome; decision-making regarding revascularization or other treatment for coronary artery disease; outcomes following revascularization procedures (i.e., angioplasty and coronary artery bypass surgery); and discharge from acute care of cardiac patients who have screened positive for depression.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Addressing disparities in access to living donor kidney transplantation in South and East Asian Canadians

Kidney Transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end stage kidney disease. Living donor kidney transplantation ensures the timeliest transplant and offers the best post-transplant survival, making it the gold standard therapy for patients with kidney failure. Unfortunately, access to living donor kidney transplantation varies by age, socioeconomic status, and race. However, our understanding of these disparities are severely limited, particularly in Canada - therefore strategies to address these issues remain poorly characterized.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Integrating knowledge generation and translation: a unique research program to study the population-level clinical outcomes, health utilization and health services delivery for patients with glomerulonephritis in BC

Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a group of immune diseases that target the kidney and affect younger and otherwise healthy people. Although each type of GN is rare, the group overall is likely a substantial burden to the healthcare system because 25% of dialysis patients have kidney failure due to GN. While GN can be treated with immune medications, these have side effects and many patients progress to dialysis despite treatment.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Omics2TreatID: Improving diagnosis and treatment of intellectual disability via an integrated -omics approach

Intellectual disability (ID) affects two-three percent of children and adults, or 140-210 million people worldwide. Defined strictly as low IQ, ID can have devastating lifelong effects on all aspects of life. The health cost of ID equals that of stroke, heart disease and cancer combined. The burden on families is incalculable. In most cases of ID, we do not know the cause (the majority is genetic), and so cannot provide effective treatment. ID can be an unchangeable fate for a child.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

A multi-centre 2x2 factorial randomized trial comparing sliding hip screws versus cancellous screws and vitamin D versus placebo on patient-important complications and quality of life in the treatment of young adult (ages 18-60) femoral neck fractures

Unlike elderly hip fractures that are commonly treated with a joint replacement, young patients are typically treated with surgical fixation devices to facilitate fracture healing, preserve the native hip, and allow for higher functional demands. Unfortunately, approximately 20% of these patients experience significant fracture healing complications and an additional 30% heal their fracture in a non-anatomic position that negatively affects their function.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Molecular detection of known and novel cancer predisposition genes

Diagnosis of inherited cancer susceptibility has implications for both the patient and their family, as certain drugs may be more effective in cancers caused by a patient’s inherited cancer risk. Carrier testing can also determine whether family members are at risk of cancer. Both the patient and at-risk family members may benefit from increased screening, surveillance and/or prophylactic cancer prevention measures. However, current gene-by-gene testing strategies are costly and time consuming.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Frailty in interstitial lung disease

Interstitial lung disease (ILD) encompasses a large number of entities that cause inflammation and/or fibrosis of the lungs. An estimated 10,000 Canadians have idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and an additional 30-40,000 have other common forms of fibrotic ILD. Fibrotic ILD reduces quality of life, is often disabling, and increases healthcare costs. The susceptibility to ILD, severity of its manifestations, frequency of adverse treatment effects, and risk of comorbidities all increase with age. Frailty is a major health problem and will be even more important with an aging population.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Leading mHealth innovation and evidence in British Columbia: HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis patient engagement in care

In 2014, mobile phone subscriptions will outnumber the world’s population. Expanded mobile phone use presents a tremendous opportunity to engage patients in care, particularly those in remote or isolated situations.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Self-regulation of physical activity behaviour: Novel theory-based intervention strategies for bolstering exercise adherence

Engaging in regular physical activity is pivotal for individuals with prediabetes. Self-regulating independent physical activity requires confidence to schedule in exercise and overcome challenges, goal-set, self-monitor, and revise plans accordingly. Social cognitive theory (SCT) encompasses these crucial components of self-regulation, and is one of the most influential theories explaining behaviour.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

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