Trainee Award

AMPR receptor trafficking and membrane surface expression in models of cerebral ischemia (stroke)

A common consequence of stroke or heart attack is brain cell death. Studies indicate that an increase in AMPA, a type of neurotransmitter receptor on the surface of brain cells, may be one of the critical causes leading to brain cell death during a stroke. Yitao Liu is investigating the mechanisms that lead to an increase of AMPA receptors on the surface of brain cells. He hopes his work contributes to a better understanding of how brain cells die following a stroke and suggest ways to limit the activity of AMPA receptors and decrease brain cell death.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Role of PI3-kinase family in phagocytosis and phagosome maturation

Successful host defense against microorganisms relies heavily upon a population of immune cells called macrophages. These cells are capable of ingesting and destroying pathogens such as bacteria and yeasts. Jimmy Lee's research will investigate the cellular mechanisms involved when macrophages ingest and destroy pathogens. Specifically, he is studying a protein family called PI(3)K, which is responsible for activating many cellular activities and is believed to enable macrophages to ingest microorganisms. He aims to identify the specific PI(3)K protein involved in this process.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Novel enzyme inhibitors for the prevention of metastatic Cancer

Carbohydrate molecules exist on the surface of all cells in the body, and control the movement of various compounds-viruses, bacteria, hormones, toxins and drugs-in and out of cells. Metastasis-the spread of malignant cancer cells-is linked to changes in the carbohydrate molecules on the surface of cancer cells. A particular enzyme helps produce mutations in these carbohydrate molecules. In earlier research, Nag Kumar showed that some compounds from a plant (used to treat type-2 diabetes in the Ayurvedic medicine system) inhibit this enzyme.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Identification of novel apoptosis-related genes and pathways in cancers using bioinformatics approaches

Programmed cell death occurs when cells respond to internal or external signals by initiating a process that results in their own death. While this process is necessary for the normal development of organisms, errors in the process can cause diseases such as cancer or neurodegenerative illnesses. Erin Pleasance is working to identify new genes that are expressed (activated) in programmed cell death and determine their role in diseases such as cancer.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Contribution of genes other than the CFTR gene to disease severity in Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a severe genetic disorder caused by one gene: the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene (CFTR). Inheriting the gene from both parents leads to CF. People with CF experience chronic respiratory infections that cause lung damage and ultimately lead to lung failure and death. Lung damage in CF is not fully understood and cannot be completely explained by the CFTR gene defect. There are considerable differences in the severity and progression of lung disease, for example, among patients with the same mutation in the CF gene.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Phylogeny of the Ichthyosporea

The Ichthyosporea are a group of single-celled parasites that infect a variety of animals, including humans. The group has only very recently been identified on the basis of some preliminary genetic data, and appears to have evolved from animals and fungi. Very little is known about these parasites, and genetic data is needed to understand their evolution and how they function. Audrey de Koning is determining the DNA sequences of some common genes in several Ichthyosporeans and comparing these sequences to the genes of other organisms.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Contribution of granzyme B-induced cell death to atherosclerotic plaque rupture

Jonathan Choy brings previous research experience in the mechanisms of controlled cell death to his work at the Cardiovascular Research Laboratory in the McDonald Research Laboratories at St. Paul's Hospital. His research focuses on atherosclerotic plaques in the vascular system—also known as hardening of the arteries—caused by a buildup of lipids on the innermost portion of the arteries. Advanced plaques tend to break down and rupture, and can lead to blood clots and heart attack.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Abnormal response to vasoactive agents in pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is a life-threatening disease; people with PHT experience shortness of breath, chest pain and fainting and live an average of 2.5 years after diagnosis. The disease involves increased production of endothelins in the lungs, which constrict blood vessels in the lungs. Endothelin is a potent vasoconstrictor (constrictor of blood vessels). Xing Cheng is investigating how certain substances produced in the lungs with PHT influence the ability of endothelin to constrict blood vessels.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Molecular mechanisms that control CD 44 mediated binding to hyaluronan in monocytes

White blood cells are the key elements of the immune system that keep our bodies healthy. Normally these cells circulate in the bloodstream, but upon infection or injury, the cells exit from blood vessels and enter the damaged tissue to promote healing. Proteins on the cell surface, called cell adhesion molecules, take white blood cells to the afflicted site. These molecules are tightly regulated to ensure they only allow cell migration into damaged tissues.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Conditioned effects in the kindling model of epilepsy

Mild electrical stimulation of various brain sites leads to the development of seizures, which intensify over time. Called the kindling phenomenon, this process has been widely studied as a model of epilepsy, neuroplasticity (learning, memory and various mental disorders) and the interictal (emotional) changes that occur between seizures in certain types of epilepsy. In his previous research, Steven Barnes demonstrated that learning plays a major role in this process.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Parent-child interactions in families of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Approximately four percent of children in elementary schools suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This disorder places children at an increased risk for developing problems such as antisocial behaviour, substance abuse and career difficulties. Carla Seipp is examining whether parents' responsiveness to a child may be an important influence on the risks and impairments associated with ADHD. Carla will compare responsiveness during interactions between mothers and sons with ADHD, and mothers and sons with no behavioural difficulties.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Therapeutic existential experiences during wilderness exposure: Implications for wilderness therapy programs

Mark Ring already holds a PhD in Biochemistry, but his focus shifted recently to work on a degree in the social sciences. He is now researching the therapeutic benefits of exposure to wilderness. Wilderness therapy has been used to help at-risk groups, such as people with mental illness, adolescent alcohol and drug users, adult female survivors of sexual abuse, and war veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Programs vary greatly, but include some outdoor adventure activity, from wilderness day trips to three-week hiking and kayaking expeditions.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Chemical high-level disinfection in acute care

Most hospital equipment is sterilized by heat or steam after use. But some types of equipment cannot be heat sterilized and must be disinfected using chemical products, which potentially could place employee health at risk. Karen Rideout is surveying BC hospitals and health care centres to assess current practices for using these chemicals. She is focusing on Glutaraldeyde, the most widely used solution in Canadian hospitals to disinfect endoscopy, bronchoscopy, ultrasound, and other equipment.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Improved assessment of exposure to regional and traffic-related pollutants and relationship to cardiac arrhythmia

Numerous studies over the last decade have associated air pollution with deaths. While many of those studies showed air pollution leads to respiratory disease, some research indicates air pollution-related deaths may involve cardiovascular conditions. The research suggests that people with chronic cardiovascular diseases are particularly susceptible to air pollution's adverse health effects. Kira Rich is investigating the impact of air pollution on patients with cardiac arrhythmia (abnormal heart rate) who have implanted cardiac defibrillators.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

The health care experiences of mothers with serious mental illness

Almost one in five British Columbians will experience mental illness during their lifetime and nearly three per cent of the population suffers from severe and persistent mental illness. Research reveals that mothers with serious mental illness face stigma, isolation, poverty, the challenges of single parenthood, problems accessing affordable and safe housing as well as difficulty finding and keeping employment. The health care system has an important role to play in supporting mothers with serious mental illness.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2002

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Trainee Award