People we've funded

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Building a provincial public health agenda for addressing geographic contributors to overdose

Research co-leads: 

  • Amanda Slaunwhite
    Provincial Health Services Authority 

Research user co-lead:

  • Gillian McLeod
    City of Delta

Team members:

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

‘Exploring Being Well Together’: Maternal & Infant Health Equity in the Context of HIV

Research co-leads: 

  • Laura Sauve
    University of British Columbia  
  • Dr. Alison Gerlach
    University of Victoria 

Research user co-lead:

  • Matthew Carwana
    BC Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia  

Team members:

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Dementia-Friendly Communities: Development of a Research Agenda

Research co-leads: 

  • Alison Phinney
    University of British Columbia - Vancouver 

Research user co-lead:

  • Dr. Lillian Hung
    Simon Fraser University, University of British Columbia – Vancouver Campus, Vancouver Coastal Health 

Team members: 

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Collaborative development of an inclusive research agenda for evaluating correctional health services

Research co-leads: 

  • Tonia Nicholls
    University of British Columbia 

Research user co-lead:

  • Nader Sharifi
    BC Mental Health & Substance Use (BCMHSUS) 

Team members: 

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Utilizing a multimodal optical device to detect cancer

Two out of every five individuals will develop cancer during their lifetime. My research program focuses on cancer prevention and diagnosis, using skin cancer as an initial platform. Skin cancer accounts for two thirds of all cancer cases and is an easily accessible organ to study using optical devices. Biopsies are typically used to detect skin cancers. Disadvantages of skin biopsies include possible disfigurement and complications, lengthy processing time, and occasionally inaccurate or inconclusive results.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

The molecular dissection of aggressive B-cell lymphoma

Aggressive B-cell lymphomas are the most common form of lymphoma and ~50% of patients are cured with modern treatments. However, the outcomes for patients whose disease is not cured are dismal with ~10% of those patients alive at 5 years. This shows that these lymphomas, although grouped together on the basis of what they look like down the microscope, represent clusters of different lymphoma groups. A better understanding of the 'molecular wiring'of these lymphomas is critical to identify patients at high risk of resistant lymphoma and providing better treatments.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Canadian Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection Study

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) occurs when there is a tear in the inner layers of a blood vessel in the heart, causing blockage and reducing blood flow and oxygen to the heart. It is an emergency condition that can result in heart attack and even death. Unfortunately, the causes of SCAD are poorly understood, and it is often misdiagnosed and mistreated.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Clinical, biological, and prognostic impact of supplemental oxygen in fibrotic interstitial lung disease

Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a progressive lung disorder with no effective treatment. Oxygen is often used to relieve symptoms at the end of life, but the evidence supporting oxygen use in these patients is based on limited data from other diseases. The lack of data on the benefits of oxygen in patients with ILD has resulted in uncertain criteria for its use and limited access to this potentially important medication.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Evaluating the renoprotective effect of acetaminophen in children with severe falciparum malaria

Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicating critical illness is an important problem, contributing to roughly 1.7 million deaths worldwide per year. Treatment is limited to dialysis, which is costly and frequently unavailable. Preventing AKI is a critical step to reduce deaths. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) has the potential to reduce AKI caused by oxidative damage from hemoglobin (released from red blood cells) and myoglobin (released from muscle cells).

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Predictors of immunotherapy benefit in patients with microsatellite stable metastatic colorectal cancer

Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer. Once metastatic, patients are generally incurable and receive treatment to prolong survival. Immunotherapies use a patient's immune system to attack their cancer. These treatments are effective in CRC patients with microsatellite instability (MSI). Unfortunately, 95% of patients lack MSI and are called microsatellite stable (MSS). This group usually doesn't respond to immunotherapy and we need to explore why.

Specific Aims:  

We aim to identify:

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Costs and benefits of tumour testing to improve cancer prevention and survival

Women who inherit a BRCA gene mutation are at high risk for breast cancer and the most lethal type of ovarian cancer, high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC).

A woman diagnosed with HGSC has a 20% chance of unknowingly carrying a BRCA mutation, and is eligible for genetic testing. Getting a blood sample to do genetic testing in this woman is critical, because if she is found to have a BRCA mutation: 1) her relatives (daughters, sisters) can be tested, and HGSC can be PREVENTED in them, and 2) she herself can be treated with PARP inhibitors that can improve survival.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Towards TB elimination in Canada: Optimizing tuberculosis screening and prevention

The World Health Organization (WHO) aims to eliminate TB by 2050, but Canada is not on target to meet that goal. To reach our national TB elimination targets, we must reduce TB rates by 10% per year but we are only reducing TB rates by 2% per year. My research program is aimed at developing evidence to improve TB screening, prevention and treatment policies in order to accelerate TB elimination in British Columbia (BC) and Canada.  

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

How can we Improve Survival from Opioid-Related Cardiac Arrest?

Deaths due to opioid overdoses have reached epidemic proportions in Canada, with nearly 8,000 Canadians losing their lives in the last two years. Knowledge of how rescuers can best respond to cardiac arrests due to opioid overdose is urgently needed.  

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest: Care gaps and opportunities to improve long-term survival

Out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest (OHCA) affects 40,000 Canadians per year. Cardiac arrest is the sudden loss of heart beating, and can occur in people with or without known heart disease. In British Columbia (BC), only 15% of these patients live (50% die before hospital, 35% die in hospital), less than 50% receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and only 3% receive bystander automatic external defibrillation. Due to a lack of connected data, little is known about the effect of treatments on long term survival, brain function and quality of life after leaving hospital.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Virtual Reality for Cognitive Training in Depression: the bWell Cognitive Care Platform

Many patients with depression struggle to return to their full level of functioning in work and other areas of life. These poor functional outcomes in depression may be related to cognitive difficulties, as patients demonstrate problems with memory, attention, and problem solving. We however lack treatments for these difficulties. Cognitive training, consisting of tasks to target cognitive deficits, has been tested but shows inconsistent results in depression.      

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Scaling up Trauma and Violence Informed Outreach with Women Affected by Violence

This 7-year, multi-site implementation project is funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), Partnership Grants competition. Through community-based research design and implementation we aim to address an urgent priority of providing access and receipt of services among women and youth affected by violence who experience the worst severity in terms of types, duration, frequency and impact of violence for their lives.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

New strategies for unclogging microcirculatory obstructions in the healthy and diabetic brain

Recent work from our laboratory has shown that the brain capillaries routinely get 'stuck,' clogged by cells and debris even under healthy conditions. Most of these clogged capillaries clear within seconds to minutes, however, some can remain stuck for much longer. We also reported that about one third of these clogged capillaries were eliminated from the blood vessel network and never get replaced. Importantly, there are certain conditions which can increase the risk of clogged blood vessels in the brain such as diabetes.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Making Healthy Connections: A Critical Anti-Racist and Decolonizing Geography of Immigrant and Indigenous Relations in Northern British Columbia

While resources support immigrant well-being in urban settings in southern Canada, little research exists on recent immigrants in northern communities. Moreover, while new research is emerging about the health disparities of Indigenous communities in remote and rural settings, there is very little research that brings the question of immigrant and Indigenous relations together.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Disease-modifying Drug Safety and Effectiveness in Multiple Sclerosis [DRUMS]

British Columbia (BC) and Canada have some of the world's highest rates of multiple sclerosis (MS). The goal of this research is to find out how safe and effective the drugs used to treat MS are when used in the everyday, real world in BC and Canada.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Structural basis of novel strategies for the inhibition of AmpC-mediated beta-lactam antibiotic resistance in the opportunistic, nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen often responsible for hospital-acquired infections, which can be very difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistance. A common mechanism of resistance is the expression of beta-lactamase enzymes, which break down and disarm classical beta-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillins. Beta-lactam antibiotics act by breaking down the bacterial cell wall, producing cell wall fragments that induce expression of the beta-lactamase, AmpC.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

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