Can Blending Western and Traditional Knowledge Improve Diabetes and Obesity Health in Urban Indigenous Communities?

Principal Investigator: 
University: 
University of British Columbia
Faculty: 
Faculty of Health and Social Development
Department: 
School of Nursing
Award Type: 

Indigenous peoples in Canada suffer from significantly higher rates of diabetes and obesity, resulting in reduced quality of life. There is often a lack of Traditional knowledge and community leadership within health, government, and community organizations. The impact of Western care services on improving health are often limited, whereas inclusion of Indigenous community-led care services has shown to improve health. Our current study will co-develop, co-implement, and co-evaluate locally-informed, culturally relevant diabetes and obesity programs in six urban/rural Indigenous Centres. The aim of the study is to blend Traditional and Western knowledge to improve diabetes and obesity services in urban/rural Indigenous communities.

Throughout the project, Community members and Advisory teams will identify needs and solutions for community specific interventions. The proposed will explore the effects of community programs on participant clinical diabetes and obesity measures. Knowledge translation activities will include community gatherings, presentations, publications, and adaptable program platforms. Knowledge gained from this will inform health policy, research, and practice for urban Indigenous communities.

Research Pillar: 
Host Institution: 
University of British Columbia
Research Location: 
University of British Columbia – Okanagan Campus
Supervisor: 
Donna Kurtz
Year: 
2019