Disease-modifying Drug Safety and Effectiveness in Multiple Sclerosis [DRUMS]

Principal Investigator: 
University: 
University of British Columbia
Faculty: 
Faculty of Medicine
Department: 
Department of Medicine
Award Type: 

British Columbia (BC) and Canada have some of the world's highest rates of multiple sclerosis (MS). The goal of this research is to find out how safe and effective the drugs used to treat MS are when used in the everyday, real world in BC and Canada.

To achieve these study goals, I have two main study Themes. The first Theme focuses on how effective the MS drugs are. I will examine whether the MS drugs can extend life expectancy or prolong a person's ability to stay mobile and walk. I will also look at whether the MS drugs have a beneficial effect on reducing the number of times a person with MS is admitted to a hospital or visits a physician. The second Theme focuses on side effects, including whether the MS drugs are associated with harmful effects, such as cancer, stroke or depression. I will be able to compare the different MS drugs to each other. Also, I will see if men and women or people of different ages and with other illnesses (such as having both MS and diabetes) respond to the MS drugs differently.

My research findings will help people with MS and their physicians when trying to make decisions as to which MS drug might be best for them. Ultimately, this study will benefit the >90,000 people living with MS in Canada.

Research Pillar: 
Host Institution: 
University of British Columbia
Research Location: 
University of British Columbia – Vancouver Campus
Supervisor: 
Helen Tremlett
Year: 
2019