Maternal/Infant health

Gene clusters and natural products from the human microbiota

Worldwide, prematurity is the leading cause of death for all infants, with almost one million deaths per year. Babies born before 32 weeks face the worst odds. These babies are only 2% of births, but they account for over 1/3 of all infant deaths. For these infants, a disease called necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) can be one of the most deadly complications of prematurity after the first week of life. NEC is an acquired condition in which intestinal tissue suddenly becomes inflamed and then begins to die off.

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Award Type: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

Women taking charge of changing childbirth in BC

Childbearing women in Canada are speaking out about their desire for respectful maternity care. The Vancouver Foundation funded Phase 1 of our provincial, community-led participatory action research project entitled "Changing Childbirth in BC: Women exploring access to high quality maternity care". A steering group of women from different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds worked with researchers and community agencies to study access to preferred models of maternity care and experiences of autonomy, respect, discrimination, or coercion when participating in a decision-making process.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017

Practice experiences of rural GP surgeons in British Columbia

The recruitment and retention of health care professionals is one of the most pressing challenges currently facing the Canadian health care system. In rural communities, the number of obstetricians and general surgeons is diminishing for a number of reasons, including difficulties in recruitment, an aging workforce, resistance to a demanding call schedule, and an increase in sub-specialization resulting in fewer ‘general’ surgeons. In some rural communities, maternity care is provided by general surgeons with enhanced obstetrical skills.

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Year: 
2007

Optimal timing of delivery for high risk pregnancies

Early delivery (delivery before spontaneous labour by induced labour or caesarean birth) is often considered for high-risk pregnancies to prevent stillbirths and protect the mother from developing pregnancy complications. However, the optimal time for early delivery is often unclear. Although birth between 37 and 41 weeks of pregnancy was once considered ideal, babies delivered early at 37 to 38 weeks are more likely to have breathing complications than babies delivered later.

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Year: 
2011
Health Category: 

Optimal timing of delivery for pregnancies with pre-existing hypertension

Chronic high blood pressure in pregnant women is associated with serious maternal and fetal complications such as poor growth, early separation of the placenta, and stillbirth. Consequently, the recommendation has been made that all women with chronic high blood pressure be considered candidates for induced delivery to reduce the risk of complications that may occur with allowing pregnancies to continue to later gestational ages.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2009
Health Category: 

Building the Evidence-base to Support Rural Maternity Health Services Policy and Planning

Dr. Stefan Grzybowski is a family physician clinical investigator and co director of the Centre for Rural Health Research within the Vancouver Coastal health Research institute. He is co-Principal Investigator of the Rural Maternity New Emerging Team, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and also co directs the British Columbia Rural and Remote Health Research Network, a Health of Population Network funded by the Michael Smith foundation. Prior to moving to Vancouver in 1994, Dr.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2008
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