Movement Disorders

Structural and functional correlates of neuroplastic change associated with stroke

In Canada, stroke is the third leading cause of neurological disease and death. Although improved acute care has resulted in greater survival rates, an increased number of Canadians suffer long-term neurological disability and a decreased quality of life following a stroke. With an aging Canadian population, the need for efficient and effective diagnostic tools and rehabilitation strategies are critical so that stroke survivors can maintain independence and a high quality of life.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2013

Biomechanically-informed non-invasive treatment for knee osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of physical disability in adults worldwide and is associated with a significant personal and economic burden. It is estimated that one in eight Canadian adults currently have osteoarthritis, which results in $10.2 billion in annual health-care costs and an additional $17.3 billion in economic impact due to loss of employment productivity and other indirect health-care costs.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2012

Relationship of Neonatal Pain and Early Brain Development of Preterm Infants on Motor Outcomes at 18 months

Between 2005 and 2009, more than 16,000 infants in British Columbia were born prematurely. Prematurely born infants are at increased risk for developing motor problems that, in many cases, significantly interfere with daily life and school performance. This degree of motor difficulty is often referred to as developmental coordination disorder, or DCD. Children with DCD struggle with many typical tasks, such as tying shoes, riding a bike, handwriting or participating in sports.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2011
Health Category: 

Allele-specific silencing of the mutant huntingtin gene in a mouse model of Huntington disease

Huntington disease is a fatal and inherited neurodegenerative disease. It is characterized by diminished voluntary motor control, cognitive decline and psychiatric disturbance. Symptoms of the disease first appear in the thirties to fifites, with death usually occurring 15 to 20 years later. While there are still no effective therapies for this disease, recent research discoveries have provided insight into how the disease develops. The normal huntingtin gene encodes a protein that is important for neuronal health.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2011

Effects of Adult Aging on Neural Control and Muscle Fatigue

Individuals 65 years of age and older constitute the fastest growing age group in Canada. With natural adult aging, the neuromuscular system (the muscles of the body and the nerves that supply them) undergo degenerative changes that are characterized by reductions in strength and power due to decreased muscle size. This age-related muscle weakness and overall decline in muscle function is referred to as sarcopenia.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2011
Health Category: 

Analysis of Integrin Function in Muscle Formation and Maintenance

Cells in multi-cellular organisms such as humans are arranged in highly complex three-dimensional structures. The cells attach to their environment through cell adhesion proteins, which create a type of living scaffolding for the body. Integrins are an important type of cell adhesion molecule that attaches cells to tissues to provide structure within the body (bone, tendon, etc). Cell adhesion has varied and critical roles during animal and human development.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2008
Subscribe to RSS - Movement Disorders