IgE-mediated inflammation generated by the airway epithelium is antigen independent: A cause of a novel asthma phenotype

Principal Investigator: 
University: 
University of British Columbia
Faculty: 
Faculty of Medicine
Department: 
Division of Critical Care Medicine
Health Profession: 
Respirologist

Asthma is the most common chronic disease in childhood and continues to increase through adulthood. When a patient has asthma, airways in the lungs become swollen and tight causing symptoms such as shortness of breath, wheezing, chest tightness, and cough. Current therapies for asthma relieve symptoms but do not restore airways back to normal function or cure the disease. 

Asthma is influenced by many different genetic and environmental factors, so despite having many drugs available and more in development it is extremely difficult to match patients to the right treatment. To better match patients to the right therapies we need to understand the process by which allergies lead to asthma. 

This project aims to find new ways to predict the response of asthmatic patients to existing and new drugs by better understanding how allergies cause asthma symptoms. We will look at several molecules in the blood known to be important in asthma, and measure them in airway tissues and cells obtained from asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients. This will give us a much better picture of what these important molecules are doing directly at the source of the allergic inflammation.

Research Pillar: 
Host Institution: 
University of British Columbia
Research Location: 
Centre for Heart Lung Innovation
Year: 
2018