aging

A Lifespan Approach Towards Understanding the Importance of Movement Skills for Health-Enhancing Physical Activity Participation

Participation in regular physical activity is associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease, overweight/obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, numerous cancers, mental and reproductive health problems, and osteoporosis. Yet, only 9% of Canadian children and adolescents and 20% of Canadian adults meet physical activity guidelines. An essential component of being active involves having the skills needed to successfully participate in an activity.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Studying motion processing with eye movements in healthy older adults and patients with ophthalmic diseases

As our population ages, an increasing number of Canadians experience difficulties with their vision. Although it is well known that both normal aging and age-related eye disease can affect a person's ability to see fine detail (such as in reading), tests of visual acuity used in regular eye examinations do not provide a complete picture of a person's ability to see in everyday situations, such as exercising and driving, where moving objects are often involved.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Design and evaluation of an evidence-based exercise program to enhance protective responses for avoiding fall-related traumatic brain injury in older adults

Falls cause up to 80% of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in older adults. Any fall from standing may cause TBI if head impact occurs. Humans use movement strategies to avoid head impact during falls, such as 'arresting' the fall with the arms. Through video capture of real-life falls, we found that these strategies persist but become less effective for older adults in long-term care, with over 1/3 of falls resulting in head impact in this setting.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Balancing act: Measuring and optimizing the challenge point in rehabilitation to improve walking balance after stroke

Up to 73% of people who are able to walk post-stroke suffer a fall, commonly within the first few months after discharge home. Optimizing the approach to rehabilitation of walking balance remains vital to long-term outcomes post-stroke.  A fall poses a significant risk of injury and erodes confidence. The loss in confidence alone can lead to decreased activity levels, loss of independence and social isolation that affect quality of life and overall health, even hastening death.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Learning from the lived experiences of aging immigrants

Co-leads:

  • Sharon Koehn
    Centre for Healthy Aging / Simon Fraser University
  • Kahir Lalji
    United Way of the Lower Mainland

Team members:

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2017

Targeting the complement system in Alzheimer’s disease

Many seniors aged 65 or older experience “age-associated memory impairment,” a normal aging process. However, Alzheimer’s disease is different, and not a normal part of aging. Alzheimer’s is a progressive brain disease with gradual loss of nerve cells and resulting problems with thinking, memory, and movement. Changes in the brain can start to happen 20 years before any memory problems appear.

Currently, no treatments are available to cure Alzheimer’s disease; however, if the disease is diagnosed and treated at an early stage, patients have a greatly improved quality of life.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Seniors Adding Life to Years (SALTY)

MSFHR is providing matching funds to support the work of a BC team lead by Dr. Kelli Stajduhar as part of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Team Operating Grant: Late Life Issues initiative. Other funding partners include Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation, Alberta Innovates Health Solutions and Alzheimer Society of Canada.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2016

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