community health

Incorporating practical, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) into the workplace: Examining the impact on physiological and psychological health, absenteeism, and work productivity

Among office workers, physical activity has been shown to have the potential to improve absenteeism, work productivity and psychological and physical health.

Dr. Stork’s research will incorporate physical activity into the workplace using high-intensity interval training (HIIT) – short-duration exercise that consists of multiple brief, high-intensity efforts, separated by periods of rest.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Improving substance use care for gay, lesbian and bisexual youth in British Columbia

Gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth (GLBY) are at increased risk of experiencing substance use disorders (SUD) in comparison to their heterosexual counterparts. The aim of Dr. Ferlatte’s research is to identify the factors associated with SUD experienced by GLBY to inform interventions.

This will include:

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Optimizing PrEP and TasP adherence among substance using gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men

While increased access to HIV treatment and other health services has contributed to significant declines in HIV among several key populations in British Columbia (BC), it is estimated that as many as 1 in 6 gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) will be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Mifepristone outcomes study: Examining abortion access, outcomes, and costs following the introduction of mifepristone

Abortion is a common reproductive health procedure, with nearly one-third of women in Canada having had at least one abortion. However, abortion access is not equitable. Most abortions are surgical, and are provided in a small number of facilities located in BC’s largest cities. Some women, particularly those in rural or remote regions, experience significant wait times and must travel long distances to reach abortion services.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Increasing HPV vaccine uptake in grade 6 girls and boys in the school-based immunization program in British Columbia

Human papillomaviruses (HPV) can lead to cervical cancer and other anogenital, head, and neck cancers in both women and men. A safe and effective vaccine against the most common types of HPV associated with cancer was introduced in 2008 into BC’s exemplary school immunization program. However, rates of HPV vaccine uptake have remained low, with less than 70% of eligible students receiving the vaccine each year.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

A program of research on criminalization of sexuality, HIV and incarceration among marginalized women

Marginalized women (trans inclusive) living with and affected by HIV are disproportionately criminalized. This research will establish an empirical evidence base that documents the lived-experiences of criminalization and incarceration among sex workers and women living with HIV. The ultimate goal is to inform evidence-based law reform and interventions to redress over criminalization and negative effects of incarceration.

The objectives of this research program are to:

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

BCaLM research program: A safe & effective lyophilized fecal microbiota transplantation program for chronic gut disorders

Many Canadians live with debilitating chronic gut disorders such as Crohn's or ulcerative colitis (also known as inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD), Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), or both. These disorders lead to increased morbidity and reduce quality of life and productivity for patients and their families. One in every 150 Canadians has IBD, which is the highest rate worldwide. CDI is the number one cause of health care-associated infection (HAI) in Canada, and associated costs are approximately $300 million per year.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017

Addressing morbidity, mortality and health care costs among patients evaluated for addiction care in acute care settings

Substance use disorders account for a significant burden of disease among Canadians and place an enormous burden on the acute care system. The annual cost of harms associated with substance use in Canada is estimated to be approximately $40 billion, with health care being the single largest contributor. In British Columbia (BC) there is clear urgency to address this challenge, given the recent steady increase in hospitalization rates due to substance use and the unprecedented number of drug overdose deaths prompting the recent declaration of a public health emergency.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

Supporting women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights through Treatment as Prevention: Investigating the impact of structural and interpersonal violence on HIV and reproductive health inequities among women living with HIV in British Columbia

BC's ambitious "90-90-90" target for 2020 aims to ensure that: 1) 90 percent of people living with HIV/AIDS are aware of their status; 2) 90 percent of those diagnosed receive sustained treatment; and 3) 90 percent of those being treated achieve viral suppression. Access and uptake from all affected groups in BC would be needed to achieve this.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

Continuing Health Impact Assessment (CHIA) of the computer-based Drug and Alcohol Training Assessment in Kenya (eDATA K)

Tobacco, alcohol and other substance use disorders (SUD) are among the most important risk factors for the global burden of disease, with a 38 percent increase in global burden of the disease from substance use in the 20 years between 1990 and 2010, mainly driven by increased drug use (57 percent) and alcohol use (32 percent).

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015
Health Category: 

Socio-economic risk environments and health among people who use drugs in British Columbia

Socio-economic well-being, which encompasses safe and sufficient income generating activity as well as adequate material resources, is intrinsically linked to health. Among marginalized people who use drugs (PWUD) who are living with or at risk of HIV/AIDS infection, socio-economic well-being is often precarious. However, the socio-economic risk environment of PWUD and its negative health impacts have not been fully examined.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

A community-based research program focused on “Adding Life to Later Years”

In 2011, an estimated 5 million Canadians were 65 years of age or older, a number that is expected to double in the next 25 years. The majority of older adults prefer to live in their family home for as long as possible. However, aging in place - the desire to remain living in the community, with some level of independence - is only possible with provision of adequate housing, transportation, recreational opportunities, health and home services and amenities that facilitate physical activity, social interaction and cultural engagement.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Pharmacoepidemiologic and pharmaceutical outcomes research to improve medication use, adherence, and outcomes in patients with arthritis

Arthritis consists of more than 100 types of conditions and is the most common cause of severe chronic pain and disability in Canada, affecting 4.4 million Canadians. People living with arthritis rely on medications to relieve symptoms, prevent their disease from worsening, and allow them to participate in daily activities. However, there are still many unanswered questions regarding these medications.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014
Subscribe to RSS - community health