exercise

Impact of Hypertension on Lung-Heart Interaction in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Over 2.5 million Canadians have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is a progressive lung condition that blocks the airways and makes it difficult to breathe. These patients experience worsening shortness of breath, increasing exercise limitation, and reduced quality of life. Patients must work harder to breathe, and the lungs can over-inflate, which can squeeze the heart and affect how it functions. Further, more than 1-in-4 patients also have high blood pressure, which might amplify the negative effects of lung over-inflation on the heart.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Design and evaluation of an evidence-based exercise program to enhance protective responses for avoiding fall-related traumatic brain injury in older adults

Falls cause up to 80% of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in older adults. Any fall from standing may cause TBI if head impact occurs. Humans use movement strategies to avoid head impact during falls, such as 'arresting' the fall with the arms. Through video capture of real-life falls, we found that these strategies persist but become less effective for older adults in long-term care, with over 1/3 of falls resulting in head impact in this setting.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Driving Brain Recovery and Enhanced Community Walking with Dual-Task Training After Stroke

Over 400,000 Canadians live with long-term disability from stroke. Stroke survivors say regaining walking ability is a top priority; but, poor cognition, or thinking abilities, can limit walking in the community. How much walking recovery someone achieves likely stems from the brain's ability to dual-task (DT), like walking while talking. In fact, almost 80% of stroke survivors struggle with some aspect of cognition limiting full walking recovery after stroke.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

The effects of 60% oxygen during exercise training in patients with fibrotic interstitial lung disease

Breathing discomfort is common in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and often results in an inability to perform physical activity, leading to a poor quality of life. Exercise training can reduce breathing discomfort and enable ILD patients to perform physical activity. However, severe breathing discomfort makes it challenging for these patients to withstand the amount of training they need to get the most benefit.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Balancing act: Measuring and optimizing the challenge point in rehabilitation to improve walking balance after stroke

Up to 73% of people who are able to walk post-stroke suffer a fall, commonly within the first few months after discharge home. Optimizing the approach to rehabilitation of walking balance remains vital to long-term outcomes post-stroke.  A fall poses a significant risk of injury and erodes confidence. The loss in confidence alone can lead to decreased activity levels, loss of independence and social isolation that affect quality of life and overall health, even hastening death.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Development, delivery and evaluation of the HAT TRICK train-the-trainer module

Co-leads:

  • Cristina Caperchione
    University of British Columbia - Okanagan
  • Kalinka Davis
    Canadian Men's Health Foundation

Team members:

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2017

Symposium for supporting safe and active recreation for Okanagan families with children living with autism

Co-leads:

  • Lise Olsen 
    University of British Columbia - Okanagan
  • Rachelle Hole
    Centre for Inclusion and Citizenship / University of British Columbia
  • Vicki Cairns
    Autism Okanagan Kelowna

Team member:

  • Alison McManus
    University of British Columbia - Okanagan 

Trainee:

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2017

Co-creation of a resource toolkit for Indigenous community health representatives

Co-leads:

  • Shannon Bredin
    University of British Columbia
  • Rosalin Miles
    Indigenous Physical Activity & Cultural Circle

Trainee:

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

ACCEss-SCI: Adapting community centres to enhance exercise in spinal cord injury

Co-leads:

  • Tania Lam
    University of British Columbia
  • Ross MacDonald
    City of Surrey
  • Jaine Priest 
    City of Vancouver

Trainee:

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Incorporating practical, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) into the workplace: Examining the impact on physiological and psychological health, absenteeism, and work productivity

Among office workers, physical activity has been shown to have the potential to improve absenteeism, work productivity and psychological and physical health.

Dr. Stork’s research will incorporate physical activity into the workplace using high-intensity interval training (HIIT) – short-duration exercise that consists of multiple brief, high-intensity efforts, separated by periods of rest.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Investigating the role of skeletal muscle dysfunction on dyspnea and exercise intolerance in interstitial lung disease

Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a group of disorders characterized by fibrosis and inflammation of the lungs. Dyspnea (i.e., breathlessness) is the most common symptom in ILD. To minimize dyspnea, ILD patients commonly avoid physical activity, leading to a progressive decline in exercise capacity, and eventually the inability to perform daily activities. Maintaining exercise capacity is important, given that ILD patients with the lowest physical activity levels have the lowest quality of life and the highest mortality.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Improving resistance training in people with rheumatoid arthritis: A foundational behaviour change science approach

Resistance training has been shown to improve myriad health indicators, including quality of life, in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, resistance training participation rates among people with RA are remarkably low (1-14%), even in those with well-controlled disease. Anecdotally, unique barriers exist that prevent those with RA from participating in resistance training, including fear, health care provider knowledge, and functional limitation.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

The effects of balance training with or without cognitive training in older adults with MCI and impaired mobility

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an intermediate stage between normal cognitive function and dementia. The rate of progression of MCI to dementia in older adults has been found to be between 10-12% per year, whereas those without cognitive impairment acquire dementia at a rate of only 1-2% per year. MCI has been linked to poor dual-tasking, impaired balance and functional mobility, and is a significant risk factor for falls. Individuals with MCI need preventive therapies that target both the cognitive and mobility-related outcomes. Dr.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2017

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