health care economics

Adding Quality Years to Later Life via Innovative Health Economics Research Methods

My career goal is to improve the health and quality of life of older Canadians through applying innovative health economic methods to lifestyle interventions among older adults at risk of falls as well as cognitive and functional decline. I propose a multi-disciplinary research program that advances health economic methods for clinical research studies.

Theme 1 of my research program will advance health economic evaluation methodology by answering the question: “Can artificial intelligence combat current methods limitations of economic evaluation?”

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2020

Costs and benefits of tumour testing to improve cancer prevention and survival

Women who inherit a BRCA gene mutation are at high risk for breast cancer and the most lethal type of ovarian cancer, high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC).

A woman diagnosed with HGSC has a 20% chance of unknowingly carrying a BRCA mutation, and is eligible for genetic testing. Getting a blood sample to do genetic testing in this woman is critical, because if she is found to have a BRCA mutation: 1) her relatives (daughters, sisters) can be tested, and HGSC can be PREVENTED in them, and 2) she herself can be treated with PARP inhibitors that can improve survival.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2019

Improving the methods of economic evaluation to support decision-making: CAR-T, uncertainty, and real-world evidence

The emergence of novel technologies in health care is associated with promising opportunities to improve patient health outcomes. Advances in health technologies also come at a substantial cost. New gene therapies have been estimated to cost between $300,000-$4,000,000 per patient. These new therapies offer promise, but do not offer certainty; decision-makers have to choose whether to reimburse the therapy with little evidence for how it might work in the real-world.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Value Judgments in Health Economics Modelling for Primary Care: Towards Patient and Public Partnership in BC

In scientific research, many decisions are needed. Some take scientific expertise, but others take knowing what people find important. Such 'value judgments' include: choosing a topic and how to study it, setting goals, and deciding how to share results.

Patients and the public can inform value judgments in research by being partners and sharing what is most important to them, including

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Health, Work and Society: Improving Health Economic Evaluations

Decision makers need to decide how to best allocate limited societal and healthcare resources to fund different healthcare services. Health economic evaluation is a tool commonly used to inform these types of funding decisions; however, which costs to consider in economic evaluation can have a significant impact on the resulting funding decision. A societal perspective considers costs within the formal healthcare sector (e.g., physician, hospital and drug costs) as well as costs outside the healthcare sector (e.g., work productivity costs of patients and their family caregivers).

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2019

Molecular classification for stratification and improved clinical management of endometrial cancers

In the current landscape of endometrial cancers (ECs), there is a shortfall in the management, treatment and evaluation of EC patients. Treatment tends to not be standardized, patients are commonly over- or under-treated, and diverse ECs are grouped together in clinical trials. Because of this inconsistency in diagnosis, it is difficult, if not impossible, to properly assess and compare how different treatments work.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2018

Incentivizing the delivery of sustainable care of chronic diseases in Canada: Case studies in musculoskeletal disease

Concerns about the sustainability of publicly funded health systems and the rising cost of care abound, yet there is little research that explores health care efficiency. Simple cost-saving exercises (i.e. cutting services) may risk harming patients, while more sophisticated, efficiency-saving approaches aim to provide health care at a greater benefit per unit of cost. Encouraging quality and value of health care delivery, whilst reducing waste, is also an indirect way to control health care costs.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2017
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