neurological disorders

Cerebrovascular burden and cognitive impairment after spinal cord injury

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a complex pathophysiology, characterized not only by paralysis but also severe autonomic cardiovascular dysfunction. After SCI, strokes are 300 - 400% more likely to occur compared to non-disabled individuals.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Alpha-synuclein and its modified forms as biomarkers for dementia with Lewy bodies

Dementia with Lewy bodies is the second most common form of dementia following Alzheimer’s disease. This disease can be challenging to identify because symptoms can resemble those of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and/or mental illness. Currently, there is no test that can spot dementia with Lewy bodies and the only way to confirm the presence of this disease is by autopsy.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP): A new model for mechanistic and therapeutic investigation

Epilepsy is one of the most common brain disorders. The condition is characterized by uncoordinated brain electrical activity and recurrent seizures. Epilepsy patients may die unexpectedly with unknown cause, a phenomenon termed “sudden unexpected death in epilepsy” (SUDEP). SUDEP accounts for about 50% of deaths in individuals suffering from drug-resistant epilepsy in which severe seizures are followed by alterations in respiratory and cardiac functions.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Re-establishing cognitive function in models of mental illness by boosting neural activity in the prefrontal cortex

The frontal cortex (FC) of the brain plays a critical role in higher cognitive functions including attention, working memory, and planning future goal-directed actions. Cognitive deficits arising from deceased neural activity within the FC (hypofrontality) are features of many forms of mental illness, including schizophrenia, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, dementia and addiction. Neurochemical, physiological and pharmacological research implicates reductions in the function of key neurotransmitter systems: catecholamines, glutamate and GABA.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Imaging repair: Developing and applying unconventional neuroimaging methods for quantitative assessment of tissue health

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for measuring changes in the brain and spinal cord that occur over the course of neurological disease. Unfortunately, conventional MRI is qualitative, so the biological cause of the changes seen on MRI is difficult to determine.

Damage to myelin, the substance that surrounds the nerve fibres (axons) of the brain and spinal cord to speed up signal transmission and protect the axons themselves, is a common feature for many neurological diseases. While myelin can be repaired, axonal damage is irreversible.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

A causal inference framework for analyzing large administrative healthcare databases with a focus on multiple sclerosis

Provincial health authorities routinely collect patient information on a massive scale, but health researchers face the challenge of exploring cause-and-effect relationships using these non-randomized population-based data sources. Machine learning methods are increasingly used to analyze these large datasets, although they do not inherently take causal structures (i.e., how the variables affect each other) into consideration and may lead to less-than-optimal or even erroneous conclusions.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2018

Impact of treatment for neurogenic bladder dysfunction on autonomic dysreflexia and cerebral blood flow in SCI individuals

Spinal cord injury (SCI) resulting from traumatic accidents is one of the most debilitating chronic conditions. In addition to the toll on quality of life, lifetime health care expenditures for these patients are among the most expensive of any medical condition, since many injuries occur in young patients who live with SCI for decades. SCI also comes with steep indirect costs, including morbidity due to chronic complications. 

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2017

Genetic dissection of neuronal pattern formation

Neurological diseases and disorders have been estimated to affect 3.6 million Canadians living in the community and over 170,000 Canadians living in long-term care facilities, including in British Columbia. However, we have limited information about the molecular mechanisms that cause many of those neurological conditions, largely because of the complexity of our nervous system. Therefore, understanding the mechanical processes that impart precise neural circuit formation using a simple model organism is critical to try to find ways to prevent neurological diseases and cure patients.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2017
Health Category: 

Implementing concussion return to activity guidelines in primary care

Throughout the history of medicine, patients who had a disease that was poorly understood were advised to rest. As scientists and doctors learned more, early mobilization and active therapies (e.g., exercise) gradually replaced rest as the conventional treatment for a variety of medical conditions, such as chronic fatigue, whiplash, stroke, low back pain, and cardiac arrest. We have now reached this same juncture for concussion care. The proposed project aims to figure out how to support doctors in implementing new science-informed return to activity guidelines for concussion.

Primary Investigator: 
Year: 
2017

Influence of community rehabilitation services on community reintegration and health utilization after stroke

Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability in adults, and community reintegration is the pivotal outcome of successful rehabilitation.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

The mechanism and significance of the synaptogenic activity of amyloid precursor protein

Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research/The Pacific Alzheimer Research Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellowship Award

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

Etiology and progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: an epidemiological analysis of environmental risk factors

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disease with fatal outcomes usually within a few years following diagnosis. The progressive degeneration of the nerve cells responsible for muscle movement leads to muscle wasting and paralysis, and eventually restricts breathing. The cause of ALS is unknown and probably includes a number of external factors.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

How is the motor learning capacity of a skilled walking task affected after an incomplete spinal cord injury?

Many people who have an incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) have the potential to improve their ability to walk. Current training strategies are limited in their ability to target skilled walking tasks (e.g. stairs and obstacles).

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2015

Detecting neuroplasticity after spinal cord injury: Implications for neuropathic pain

Current interventions for neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) have proven largely ineffective, an unfavorable outcome that can be partly attributed to poor understanding of mechanisms.

Primary Investigator: 
Award Type: 
Year: 
2014

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - neurological disorders