Fuse 2018: Choose your workshops

On May 8-10, 2018, MSFHR is co-hosting Fuse 2018, the 4th Fuse International Conference on Knowledge Exchange in Public Health.

In addition to six panels and plenary sessions, lightning talks and oral presentations, we are delighted to present four workshops exploring how researchers and policy-makers can communicate evidence, build trust in collaborations, and use each other’s strengths.

These workshops will take place across two sessions, running parallel to the oral presentation sessions.

Explore the workshops below, and the full program, to start building your Fuse 2018 schedule. Not registered? Secure your place!

Registration is limited to approximately 150 people – large enough to have diverse perspectives in the room, but small enough to have good, productive conversations in plenary.

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

13:00 - 14:20 Workshop 1:
An executive summary is not enough: Innovative reports for public health
Workshop 2:
Theorizing trust mechanisms in collaborative and co-productive public health contexts: A realist methodology open forum
Oral presentation sessions 1 - 3
14:45 - 16:05 Workshop 3:
How to develop a structural approach to knowledge exchange? Practice-based workshop on effectively linking communication activities between researchers
Workshop 4:
Closing the loop between life scientists and policy-makers: Lessons learned from developing policy frameworks for substance use
Oral presentation sessions 4 & 5

Workshop 1: An executive summary is not enough: Innovative reports for public health

Communicating evidence effectively is key for translating research into practice, but all too often we rely on lengthy journal articles or less-than-engaging one-size-fits-all reports that don’t meet the needs of busy decision-makers or diverse audiences.

This workshop will offer four principles for more effective reporting along with innovative alternatives that not only capture the attention of stakeholders, but inspire them to action.

Kylie Hutchinson, Principal Consultant, Community Solutions Planning & Evaluation, Canada


Workshop 2: Theorizing trust mechanisms in collaborative and co-productive public health contexts: A realist methodology open forum

There is much work to be done to improve the trust theories that seek to explain what motivates people to sustain collaborative relationships, and/or engage in improvement efforts. However trust, as a key mechanism, has a characteristic intangibility that precludes scientific measurement.

Using an ‘open mic’ structure, this workshop will focus on group conversation about the nature of trust drawing on the presenter’s experience using realist methodology for community-based participatory assessment, and invite participants share their wealth of insight into the nature of trust in collaborations.

Justin Jagosh, Senior Research Fellow, Institute of Psychology Health and Society, University of Liverpool, England


Workshop 3: How to develop a structural approach to knowledge exchange? Practice-based workshop on effectively linking communication activities between researchers 

The principle that researchers should engage with policy is well established within public health. There has also been an increasing professionalization of and investment in research communication, but although individual effort is plentiful, strategy and structures to connect communications to impact can be missing.

This workshop will explore the importance of interlinking knowledge activities that engage policy-makers at different levels. Participants will develop a structural knowledge exchange approach, identifying existing communications strengths and exploring how these can be used as part of more joined up pathways to impact.

Peter van der Graaf, Knowledge Exchange Broker, School of Health & Social Care, Teesside University, England
Oliver Francis, Head of Communications & Knowledge Exchange, MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, England
Mark Welford, Fuse Communications Officer, Health & Social Care Institute Teesside University, England


Workshop 4: Closing the loop between life scientists and policy-makers: Lessons learned from developing policy frameworks for substance use 

In recent years, Canada has welcomed an increase in demand for evidence-based decision making and many efforts to engage scientists with government have been implemented at both federal and provincial levels.

Drawing on a real life example, using scientific evidence in policy-making around the treatment of opioid addiction, participants will explore the working dynamic between scientists and policy-makers and how the two groups can most effectively work with each other.

Participants will gain deeper understanding of their communication styles and perspectives, and will gain skills in how to overcome these differences and best utilize each other’s strength.

Julienne Jagdeo, The Science and Policy Integration Network, Canada
Conny Lin, The Science and Policy Integration Network, Canada
Kenneth Tupper, Director of Implementation & Partnership. BC Centre for Substance Use, Canada
Ronald Joe, Medical Director Substance Use Services, Vancouver Coastal Health, Canada

Explore the full program

Register now